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Palaeography (history of writing)

See below for a selection of the latest books from Palaeography (history of writing) category. Presented with a red border are the Palaeography (history of writing) books that have been lovingly read and reviewed by the experts at Lovereading. With expert reading recommendations made by people with a passion for books and some unique features Lovereading will help you find great Palaeography (history of writing) books and those from many more genres to read that will keep you inspired and entertained. And it's all free!

A Handbook of 'Phags-pa Chinese

A Handbook of 'Phags-pa Chinese

Author: W. South Coblin Format: Hardback Release Date: 12/10/2019

'Phags-pa Chinese is the earliest form of the Chinese language to be written in a systematically devised alphabetic script. It is named after its creator, a brilliant thirteenth-century Tibetan scholar-monk who also served as political adviser to Kublai Khan. 'Phags-pa's invention of an alphabet for the Mongolian language remains an extraordinarily important accomplishment, both conceptually and practically. With it he achieved nothing less than the creation of a unified script for all of the numerous peoples in the Mongolian empire, including the Central Asian Turks and Sinitic-speaking Chinese. 'Phags-pa is of immense importance for the study of premodern Chinese phonology. However, the script is difficult to read and interpret, and secondary materials on it are scattered and not easily obtained. The present book is intended as a practical introduction to 'Phags-pa Chinese studies and a guide for reading and interpreting the script. It consists of two parts. The first part is an introductory section comprising four chapters. This is followed by a glossary of 'Phags-pa Chinese forms and their corresponding Chinese characters, together with pinyin and stroke order indexes to those characters. The first introductory chapter outlines the invention of the 'Phags-pa writing system, summarizes the major types of material preserved in it, and describes the historical and linguistic contexts in which this invention occurred. Following chapters detail the history of 'Phags-pa studies, the alphabet and its interpretation, and the salient features of the underlying sound system represented by the script, comparing it with those of various later forms of Chinese that have been recorded in alphabetic sources. A Handbook of 'Phags-pa Chinese will be of special interest to Chinese historical phonologists and scholars concerned with the history and culture of China and Central Asia during the Yuan period (1279-1368 A.D.).

Giles of Rome's De regimine principum Reading and Writing Politics at Court and University, c.1275-c.1525

Giles of Rome's De regimine principum Reading and Writing Politics at Court and University, c.1275-c.1525

Author: Charles F. (Georgia Southern University) Briggs Format: Hardback Release Date: 01/10/2019

From the time of its composition (c.1280) for Philip the Fair of France until the early sixteenth century, Giles of Rome's mirror of princes, the De regimine principum, was read by both lay and clerical readers in the original Latin and in several vernacular translations, and served as model or source for several works of princely advice. This study examines the relationship between this didactic political text and its audience by focusing on the textual and material aspects of the surviving manuscript copies, as well as on the evidence of ownership and use found in them and in documentary and literary sources. Briggs argues that lay readers used De regimine for several purposes, including as an educational treatise and military manual, whereas clerics, who often first came into contact with it at university, glossed, constructed apparatus for, and modified the text to suit their needs in their later professional lives.

Digital Palaeography

Digital Palaeography

Palaeography, both in the narrow sense of the history of handwriting and more broadly as book history and the study of documents and manuscripts as material objects, stands as the foundation of much of medieval studies. However, the palaeographical method has undergone a significant transformation in recent years, due on the one hand to the ever continuing desire for greater rigour, and on the other to the sudden availability of many thousands - if not millions - of digitised manuscripts and relatively powerful desktop computers with which to manipulate them. This book presents an authoritative reflection of the state of the art in the application of ICT to the field of palaeography. Although the focus is on palaeography in the narrow sense of Western European medieval handwriting, some chapters apply to the field more widely and encompass issues such as crowdsourcing, diplomatics, and digital libraries as well as Hebrew and modern manuscripts.

The Renaissance Reform of the Book and Britain The English Quattrocento

The Renaissance Reform of the Book and Britain The English Quattrocento

Author: David (University of Kent, Canterbury) Rundle Format: Hardback Release Date: 02/05/2019

What has fifteenth-century England to do with the Renaissance? By challenging accepted notions of 'medieval' and 'early modern' David Rundle proposes a new understanding of English engagement with the Renaissance. He does so by focussing on one central element of the humanist agenda - the reform of the script and of the book more generally - to demonstrate a tradition of engagement from the 1430s into the early sixteenth century. Introducing a cast-list of scribes and collectors who are not only English and Italian but also Scottish, Dutch and German, this study sheds light on the cosmopolitanism central to the success of the humanist agenda. Questioning accepted narratives of the slow spread of the Renaissance from Italy to other parts of Europe, Rundle suggests new possibilities for the fields of manuscript studies and the study of Renaissance humanism.

Writing Making Your Mark

Writing Making Your Mark

Author: Ewan Clayton Format: Hardback Release Date: 25/04/2019

Writing surrounds us in the modern world - but how did it develop into the systems we use today, and given the technological developments of the twenty-first century, what does its future hold? This beautifully illustrated book, published to coincide with an interactive landmark British Library exhibition, celebrates the act of writing from across the globe. Exploring the history of writing and including more than 150 illustrations from carved stone inscriptions and medieval manuscripts to samples of early printing, modern handwriting and digital inputting systems, it reflects on the use of writing over the last 5,000 years and challenges our preconceptions about writing's decline in the digital age.

Writing Making Your Mark

Writing Making Your Mark

Author: Ewan Clayton Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 25/04/2019

Writing surrounds us in the modern world - but how did it develop into the systems we use today, and given the technological developments of the twenty-first century, what does its future hold? This beautifully illustrated book, published to coincide with an interactive landmark British Library exhibition, celebrates the act of writing from across the globe. Exploring the history of writing and including more than 150 illustrations from carved stone inscriptions and medieval manuscripts to samples of early printing, modern handwriting and digital inputting systems, it reflects on the use of writing over the last 5,000 years and challenges our preconceptions about writing's decline in the digital age.

Palaeohispanic Languages and Epigraphies

Palaeohispanic Languages and Epigraphies

In addition to Phoenician, Greek, and Latin, at least four writing systems were used between the fifth century BCE and the first century CE to write the indigenous languages of the Iberian peninsula (the so-called Palaeohispanic languages): Tartessian, Iberian, Celtiberian, and Lusitanian. In total over three thousand inscriptions are preserved in what is certainly the largest corpus of epigraphic expression in the western Mediterranean world, with the exception of the Italian peninsula. The aim of this volume is to present the most recent cutting-edge scholarship on these epigraphies and on the languages that they transmit. Utilizing a multidisciplinary approach which draws on the expertise of leading specialists in the field, it brings together a broad range of perspectives on the linguistic, philological, epigraphic, numismatic, historical, and archaeological aspects of the surviving inscriptions, and provides invaluable new insights into the social, economic, and cultural history of Hispania and the ancient western Mediterranean. The study of these languages is essential to our understanding of colonial Phoenician and Greek literacy, which lies at the root of their growth, as well as of the diffusion of Roman literacy, which played an important role in the final expansion of the so called Palaeohispanic languages.

Writing and Society in Ancient Cyprus

Writing and Society in Ancient Cyprus

Author: Philippa M. (Magdalene College, Cambridge) Steele Format: Hardback Release Date: 25/10/2018

From its first adoption of writing at the beginning of the Late Bronze Age, ancient Cyprus was home to distinctive scripts and writing habits, often setting it apart from other areas of the Mediterranean and Near East. This well-illustrated volume is the first to explore the development and importance of Cypriot writing over a period of more than 1,500 years in the second and first millennia BC. Five themed chapters deal with issues ranging from the acquisition of literacy and the adaptation of new writing systems to the visibility of writing and its role in the marking of identities. The agency of Cypriots in shaping the island's literate landscape is given prominence, and an extended consideration of the social context of writing leads to new insights on Cypriot scripts and their users. Cyprus provides a stimulating case to demonstrate the importance of contextualised approaches to the development of writing systems.

The Key to Chinese Civilization The Explication and Exploration of Chinese Characters

The Key to Chinese Civilization The Explication and Exploration of Chinese Characters

Author: Dekuan Huang Format: Hardback Release Date: 26/07/2018

The Key to Chinese Civilization: The Explication and Exploration of Chinese Characters is a fascinating guide to the history of the Chinese civilization, which has been recorded not just by means of the Chinese characters but also in the characters themselves. It studies the long history of Chinese characters, the laws of their construction and development, and what their correct interpretation can mean for contemporary communication. The Chinese writing system, vastly different from phonetic alphabet systems and the oldest continuously used system of writing in the world, is dynamic and its evolution reveals much about the historical and sociocultural development of China. The book shows how the interpretation of the cultural connotation of Chinese characters is necessary, even crucial, though it is a daunting task. It proposes a scientific method for this kind of interpretation and gives elaborate examples. Authored by an expert in philology and palaeography, the book is written in simple language and will be of great help to Chinese language enthusiasts.

Egyptian Oedipus Athanasius Kircher and the Secrets of Antiquity

Egyptian Oedipus Athanasius Kircher and the Secrets of Antiquity

Author: Daniel Stolzenberg Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 30/06/2015

Athanasius Kircher, S. J. (1601/2-80), was one of Europe's most inventive and versatile scholars in the baroque era. But Kircher is most famous - or infamous - for his quixotic attempt to decipher the Egyptian hieroglyphs and reconstruct the ancient traditions they encoded. Here Daniel Stolzenberg presents a new interpretation of Kircher's hieroglyphic studies, placing them in the context of seventeenth-century scholarship on paganism and Oriental languages. The spectacular flaws of his scholarship have fostered an image of Kircher as an eccentric anachronism, a throwback to the Renaissance hermetic tradition. Stolzenberg argues against this view, showing how Kircher embodied essential tensions of a pivotal phase in European intellectual history, when pre-Enlightenment scholars pioneered modern empirical methods of studying the past while still working within traditional frameworks, such as biblical history and beliefs about magic and esoteric wisdom.

Writing and Literacy in Chinese, Korean and Japanese <strong></strong>

Writing and Literacy in Chinese, Korean and Japanese

Author: Insup Taylor, M. Martin Taylor Format: Hardback Release Date: 15/12/2014

The book describes how the three East Asian writing systems-Chinese, Korean, and Japanese- originated, developed, and are used today. Uniquely, this book: (1) examines the three East Asian scripts (and English) together in relation to each other, and (2) discusses how these scripts are, and historically have been, used in literacy and how they are learned, written, read, and processed by the eyes, the brain, and the mind. In this second edition, the authors have included recent research findings on the uses of the scripts, added several new sections, and rewritten several other sections. They have also added a new Part IV to deal with issues that similarly involve all the four languages/scripts of their interest. The book is intended both for the general public and for interested scholars. Technical terms (listed in a glossary) are used only when absolutely necessary.

Writing and Literacy in Chinese, Korean and Japanese <strong></strong>

Writing and Literacy in Chinese, Korean and Japanese

Author: Insup Taylor, M. Martin Taylor Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 15/12/2014

The book describes how the three East Asian writing systems-Chinese, Korean, and Japanese- originated, developed, and are used today. Uniquely, this book: (1) examines the three East Asian scripts (and English) together in relation to each other, and (2) discusses how these scripts are, and historically have been, used in literacy and how they are learned, written, read, and processed by the eyes, the brain, and the mind. In this second edition, the authors have included recent research findings on the uses of the scripts, added several new sections, and rewritten several other sections. They have also added a new Part IV to deal with issues that similarly involve all the four languages/scripts of their interest. The book is intended both for the general public and for interested scholars. Technical terms (listed in a glossary) are used only when absolutely necessary.