LoveReading

Becoming a member of the LoveReading community is free.

No catches, no fine print just unadulterated book loving, with your favourite books saved to your own digital bookshelf.

New members get entered into our monthly draw to win £100 to spend in your local bookshop Plus lots lots more…

Find out more

Autobiography: literary

See below for a selection of the latest books from Autobiography: literary category. Presented with a red border are the Autobiography: literary books that have been lovingly read and reviewed by the experts at Lovereading. With expert reading recommendations made by people with a passion for books and some unique features Lovereading will help you find great Autobiography: literary books and those from many more genres to read that will keep you inspired and entertained. And it's all free!

You Have a Lot to Lose Volume 2

You Have a Lot to Lose Volume 2

Author: C. K. Stead Format: Hardback Release Date: 30/11/2020

New Zealand's most extraordinary literary everyman - poet, novelist, critic, activist - C. K. Stead told the story of his first twenty-three years in South-West of Eden. In this second volume of his memoirs, Stead takes us from the moment he left New Zealand for a job in rural Australia, through study abroad, writing and a university career, until he left the University of Auckland to write full time aged fifty-three. It is a tumultuous tale of literary friends and foes (Curnow and Baxter, A. S. Byatt and Barry Humphries and many more) and of navigating a personal and political life through the social change of the 1960s and 70s. And, at its heart, it is an account of a remarkable life among books - of writing and reading, critics and authors, students and professors. From Booloominbah to Menton, The New Poetic to All Visitors Ashore, from Vietnam to the Springbok Tour, C. K. Stead's You Have a Lot to Lose takes readers on a remarkable voyage through New Zealand's intellectual and cultural history.

A Little Annihilation

A Little Annihilation

Author: Anna Janko Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 26/11/2020

Black Boy

Black Boy

Author: Richard Wright Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 01/10/2020

Richard Wright's memoir of his childhood as a young black boy in the American south of the 1920s and 30s is a stark depiction of African-American life and a powerful exploration of racial tension. 'A compelling indictment of life in the Deep South between the wars' Daily Telegraph At four years old, Richard Wright set fire to his home in a moment of boredom; at five his father deserted the family; by six Richard was - temporarily - an alcoholic. It was in saloons, railroad yards and streets that he learned the facts about life, about fear, hunger and hatred, while his mother's long illness taught him about suffering. In a world of white hostility and subjugation it would be his love of books and pursuit of knowledge that would propel him to follow his dream of justice and opportunity in the north. A chronicle of coming of age under the racial prejudices of the American south, as much the story of a writer finding his voice, Black Boy remains one of the great, impassioned memoirs of the twentieth century.

Hysteria

Hysteria

Author: Katerina Bryant Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 30/09/2020

Katerina Bryant's debut Hysteria is an astounding hybrid memoir exploring chronic mental illness and the treatment of women's health throughout history. When Katerina Bryant suddenly began experiencing chronic seizures, she was plunged into a foreign world of doctors and psychiatrists, who understood her condition as little as she did. Reacting the only way she knew how, she immersed herself in books, reading her way through her own complicated diagnosis and finding a community of women who shared similar experiences. In the tradition of Siri Hustvedt's The Shaking Woman, Bryant blends memoir with literary and historical analysis to explore women's medical treatment. Hysteria retells the stories of silenced women, from the 'Queen of Hysterics' Blanche Wittmann to Mary Glover's illness termed 'hysterica passio' - a panic attack caused by the movement of the uterus - in London in 1602 and more. By centring these stories of women who had no voice in their own diagnosis and treatment, Bryant finds her own voice: powerful, brave and resonant.

The Shadowy Third

The Shadowy Third

Author: Julia Parry Format: Hardback Release Date: 17/09/2020

A sudden death in the family delivers Julia a box of love letters. Dusty with age, they tell the story of an illicit affair between the brilliant twentieth-century novelist, Elizabeth Bowen, and a young academic called Humphry House - Julia's grandfather. Using fascinating unpublished correspondence, The Shadowy Third exposes the affair and its impact by following the overlapping lives of three very different characters through some of the most dramatic decades of the twentieth century; from the rarefied air of Oxford in the 1930s, to the Anglo-Irish Big House, to the last days of Empire in India and on into the Second World War. The story is spiced with social history and a celebrated supporting cast that includes Isaiah Berlin and Virginia Woolf. In the style of Bowen, a novelist obsessed by sense of place, Julia travels to all the locations written about in the letters, retracing the physical and emotional songlines from Kolkata to Cambridge, Ireland to Texas. With present day story telling that acts as a colourful counterpoint to the historical narrative, this is an unparalleled debut work of personal and familial investigation.

Katherine Mansfield and Elizabeth Von Arnim

Katherine Mansfield and Elizabeth Von Arnim

Author: Gerri Kimber Format: Hardback Release Date: 31/08/2020

Explores the literary connection between Katherine Mansfield and Elizabeth von Arnim Elizabeth von Arnim is best remembered as the author of Elizabeth and Her German Garden (1898) and The Enchanted April (1922), as well as being the elder cousin of Katherine Mansfield. Recently, new research into the complex relationship between these writers has extended our understanding of the familial, personal and literary connections between these unlikely friends. We know that they were an influential presence on one another and reviewed each other's work. By bringing the work of Mansfield and von Arnim together - including on matters of artistry, on mourning, on gardens, on female resistance - this book establishes shared preoccupations in ways that refine and extend our knowledge of writing in the period. It also deepens our understanding of the historical and literary contexts within which both of these extraordinary authors worked.

Two-Part Invention

Two-Part Invention

Author: Madeleine L'Engle Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 27/08/2020

In the final memoir of her Crosswicks Journals, the author of A Wrinkle in Time paints an intimate portrait of her forty-year marriage. A long-term marriage has to move beyond chemistry to compatibility, to friendship, to companionship. As Newbery Medal winner Madeleine L'Engle describes a relationship characterized by compassion, respect, and growth, as well as challenge and conflict, she beautifully evokes the life she and her husband, actor Hugh Franklin, built and the family they cherished. Beginning with their very different childhoods, L'Engle chronicles the twists and turns that led two young artists to New York City in the 1940s, where they were both pursuing careers in theater. While working on a production of Anton Chekov's The Cherry Orchard, they sparked a connection that would endure until Franklin's death in 1986. L'Engle recalls years spent raising their children at Crosswicks, the Connecticut farmhouse that became an icon of family, and the support she and her husband drew from each other as artists struggling-separately and together-to find both professional and personal fulfillment. At once heartfelt and heartbreaking, Two-Part Invention is L'Engle's most personal work-the revelation of a marriage and the exploration of intertwined lives inevitably marked by love and loss. This ebook features an illustrated biography of Madeleine L'Engle including rare images from the author's estate.

Conversations with the Conroys

Conversations with the Conroys

Author: Nikky Finney Format: Hardback Release Date: 23/08/2020

A New York Times best-selling author of eleven novels and memoirs, Pat Conroy is one of America's most beloved storytellers and a writer as synonymous with the South Carolina lowcountry as pluff mud or the Palmetto tree. As Conroy's writings have been rooted in autobiography more often than not, his readers have come to know and appreciate much about the once-secret dark familial history that has shaped Conroy's life and work. Conversations with the Conroys opens further the discussion of the Conroy family through five revealing interviews conducted in 2014 with Pat Conroy and four of his six siblings: brothers Mike, Jim, and Tim and sister Kathy. In confessional and often comic dialogs, the Conroys openly discuss the perils of being raised by their larger-than-life parents, USMC fighter pilot Col. Don Conroy (the Great Santini) and southern belle Peggy Conroy (nee Peek); the complexities of having their history of abuse made public by Pat's books; the tragic death of their youngest brother, Tom; the chasm between them and their sister Carol Ann; and the healing, redemptive embrace they have come to find over time in one another. With good humor and often-striking candor, these interviews capture the Conroys as authentic and indeed proud South Carolinians, not always at ease with their place in literary lore, but nonetheless deeply supportive of Pat in his life and writing. Edited and introduced by the Palmetto State's preeminent historian, Walter Edgar, Conversations with the Conroys includes the first publications of Pat Conroy's interview with Edgar as the keynote address of the 2014 One Book, One Columbia citywide big read program, the unprecedented interview with the Conroy siblings for SCETV Radio's Walter Edgar's Journal, the resulting live Conroy Family Roundtable held at the 2014 South Carolina Book Festival, and a recent interview in Charleston following Pat Conroy's induction into the Citadel's Athletics Hall of Fame. This collection is augmented with an afterword from National Book Award-winning poet Nikky Finney and nearly fifty photographs, many from the Pat Conroy Archive in the Irvin Department of Rare Books and Special Collections, University of South Carolina Libraries, and published here for the first time. Through the resulting treasure trove of text and images, this volume is as much a keepsake for Conroy's legion of devoted fans as it is a wealth of insider information to broaden the understanding of readers and researchers alike of the idiosyncratic world of Pat Conroy and his family.

Reading through the Night

Reading through the Night

Author: Jane Tompkins Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 23/08/2020

Jane Tompkins, a renowned literature professor and award-winning author, thought she knew what reading was until, struck by a debilitating illness, she finds herself reading day and night because it is all she can do. A lifelong lover of books, she realizes for the first time that if you pay close attention to your reactions as you read, literature can become a path of self-discovery. Tompkins's inner journey begins when she becomes captivated unexpectedly by an account of friendship between two writers to whom she'd given little thought, Paul Theroux and V. S. Naipaul. Theroux's memoir launches her on a path of introspection that stretches back to the first weeks of her life in a Bronx hospital, and forward to her relationship with her mother and the structure of her present marriage. Her reading experience, intensified by the feelings of powerlessness and loss of self that come with chronic illness, expands to include writers such as Henning Mankell and Ann Patchett, Alain de Botton, Elena Ferrante, and Anthony Trollope. As she makes her way through their books, she recognizes herself in them, stumbling across patterns of feeling and behavior that have ruled her without her knowing it-envy, a desire for fame, fear of confronting the people she loves, a longing for communion. The reader, along with Tompkins, comes to the realization that literature can be not only a source of information and entertainment, not only a balm and a refuge, but also a key to unlocking long-forgotten memories that lead to a new understanding of one's life.

Selected Letters of Robert Penn Warren

Selected Letters of Robert Penn Warren

Author: Robert Penn Warren Format: Hardback Release Date: 23/08/2020

Selected Letters of Robert Penn Warren, Volume three, provides an indispensable glimpse of Warren the writer and the man, covering a crucial decade in his life. Edited by Randy Hendricks and James A. Perkins, and introduced by William Bedford Clark, this collection of largely previously unpublished letters and newly discovered material documents Warren's time at the University of Minnesota, his writing and publication of the Pulitzer Prize-winning novel All the King's Men, his appointment as Consultant in Poetry at the Library of Congress, and his divorce from Emma Cinina Brescia and subsequent marriage to the writer Eleanor Clark. The period 1943-1952 also saw the publication of A Poem of Pure Imagination ; World Enough and Time; The Ballad of Billie Potts; At Heaven's Gate; and Selected Poems, 1923-1943. Warren's letters shed new light on those works and on his close relationship with his editors Lambert Davis and Albert Erskine. Included too is correspondence concerning Warren's collaboration with Robert Rossen on the movie production of All the King's Men, which received the Academy Award for best picture in 1949. The list of friends and colleagues with whom Warren communicated reads like a roll call of major twentieth-century literary figures and clearly shows his ever-widening influence on the world of letters. Spanning a remarkable range in both style and tone, the letters disclose Warren's attitudes toward his work as a teacher and his thoughts on the events of World War II, the Korean War, and the political conflicts in postwar Europe. Thoroughly annotated and scrupulously researched, Volume Three captures Warren in an extraordinary phase in his life and career, reaching his maturity and making many commitments at once yet pursuing them all with a seemingly boundless energy.

Imaginative Trespasser

Imaginative Trespasser

Author: Patrick Cullinan Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 22/08/2020

During her exile in Botswana, Bessie Head conducted a correspondence with the South African poet and publisher Patrick Cullinan and his wife, Wendy, that became a record of her struggle to survive her isolation, and that traces Head's discovery of her powers as a writer. The Cullinans were among her few constant sources of moral, and sometimes material, support, and in the warm exchange of letters that passed between them, a picture emerges of the period during which so many South African writers and activists faced the challenge of exile. Cullinan's commentary on Head's letters is trenchant and engaging, and he uses his own considerable skills as a writer to construct a narrative that is both absorbing and illuminating. Imaginative Trespasser is a poignant account of a friendship that grew in and through letters, survived the pressures of exile, and yet was deeply damaged by the demons that Bessie Head carried within her during the difficult years of her life in Botswana.

The Road

The Road

Author: Jack London Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 22/08/2020

In 1894, an eighteen-year-old Jack London quit his job shoveling coal, hopped a freight train, and left California on the first leg of a ten thousand-mile odyssey. His adventure was an exaggerated version of the unemployed migrations made by millions of boys, men, and a few women during the original great depression of the 1890s. By taking to the road, young wayfarers like London forged a vast hobo subculture that was both a product of the new urban industrial order and a challenge to it. As London's experience suggests, this hobo world was born of equal parts desperation and fascination. I went on 'The Road,' he writes, because I couldn't keep away from it...because I was so made that I couldn't work all my life on 'one same shift'; because - well, just because it was easier to than not to. The best stories that London told about his hoboing days can be found in The Road , a collection of nine essays with accompanying illustrations, most of which originally appeared in Cosmopolitan magazine between 1907 and 1908. His virile persona spoke to white middle-class readers who vicariously escaped their desk-bound lives and followed London down the hobo trail. The zest and humor of his tales, as Todd DePastino explains in his lucid introduction, often obscure their depth and complexity. The Road is as much a commentary on London's disillusionment with wealth, celebrity, and the literary marketplace as it is a picaresque memoir of his youth.