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Film theory & criticism

See below for a selection of the latest books from Film theory & criticism category. Presented with a red border are the Film theory & criticism books that have been lovingly read and reviewed by the experts at Lovereading. With expert reading recommendations made by people with a passion for books and some unique features Lovereading will help you find great Film theory & criticism books and those from many more genres to read that will keep you inspired and entertained. And it's all free!

Movies As Artifacts

Movies As Artifacts

Author: Michael T. Marsden Format: Hardback Release Date: 01/01/1982

The South and Film

The South and Film

Author: Warren French Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 01/06/1981

Will the South rise again--this time cinematically? The answer to this question is among the subjects considered in this collection of essays. Though the South has provided the setting for outstanding and controversial films such as Gone With the Wind and The Birth of a Nation, these did not foster a genre of imitative films, and there never was a Southern as there was a Western. This may have changed, however, in 1969-70 with the appearance of a film that suggested a set of stereotypes particularly congenial to films with southern settings. In Easy Rider, the characters departed not for the West on horseback but for the South on motorcycles, carrying with them the seeds of their own destruction, and since then the only credible films about the West have been parodies. Following Easy Rider, there have been several gasoline operas, and the South has been prominently featured in them. These attempts to create a Southern film genre and the fascinating question of how long it can be maintained is the focus of four of the essays in this collection. In addition, there are provocative reconsiderations of the Southern film classics Gone With the Wind, The Birth of a Nation, Jezebel, and The Southerner. Another group of essays looks at the vision of the South projected in the works of three renowned auteurs--John Ford, Robert Altman, and Martin Ritt. Any discussions about the South and film would be incomplete without a consideration of the importance of female characters and the relation of film to the works of William Faulkner, and these are the subjects of two groups of essays. The final section of essays focuses on the problems of capturing on film the unique qualities of a region and on the perils and pleasures of the search for authenticity when shooting in regional locations. These essays, which introduce a vast subject, were included in the Spring/Summer 1981 issue of The Southern Quarterly: A Journal of the Arts in the South.

Movies as Social Criticism

Movies as Social Criticism

Author: I. C. Jarvie Format: Hardback Release Date: 28/06/1978

...a fine introduction to the study of film criticism and the impact on films and society...- CHOICE

Slow Fade to Black

Slow Fade to Black

Author: Thomas (Professor of Music, Professor of Music, Morgan State University) Cripps Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 01/09/1977

Set against the backdrop of the black struggle in society, Slow Fade to Black is the definitive history of African-American accomplishment in film-both before and behind the camera-from the earliest movies through World War II. As he records the changing attitudes toward African-Americans both in Hollywood and the nation at large, Cripps explores the growth of discrimination as filmmakers became more and more intrigued with myths of the Old South: the lost cause aspect of the Civil War, the stately mansions and gracious ladies of the antebellum South, the happy slaves singing in the fields. Cripps shows how these characterizations culminated in the blatantly racist attitudes of Griffith's The Birth of a Nation, and how this film inspired the N.A.A.C.P. to campaign vigorously-and successfully-for change. While the period of the 1920s to 1940s was one replete with Hollywood stereotypes (blacks most often appeared as domestics or natives, or were portrayed in shiftless, cowardly Stepin Fetchit roles), there was also an attempt at independent black production-on the whole unsuccessful. But with the coming of World War II, increasing pressures for a wider use of blacks in films, and calls for more equitable treatment, African-Americans did begin to receive more sympathetic roles, such as that of Sam, the piano player in the 1942 classic Casablanca. A lively, thorough history of African-Americans in the movies, Slow Fade to Black is also a perceptive social commentary on evolving racial attitudes in this country during the first four decades of the twentieth century.

The Major Film Theories

The Major Film Theories

Author: J. D. Andrew Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 15/04/1976

Dudley Andrew is a master at making the world of film theory accessible to a largely mystified public. Since the publication of his Major Film Theories, a classic in the field, the sophistication of the debate concerning the proper approach to film has grown. It is now the province of critics and universities instead of directors and artists, and this book concentrates on the main areas of the debate rather than on the individual figures. Andrew provides lucid explanations of theories which involve perceptual psychology and structuralism; semiotics and psychoanalysis; hermeneutics and genre study. Throughout he presents his own strong views on the relationship of film theory to criticism, history, and analysis. His clear approach to often obscure theories goes a long way towards bringing an important area of cultural discussion out of its academic exile.

Kiss Kiss Bang Bang

Kiss Kiss Bang Bang

Author: Pauline Kael Format: Hardback Release Date: 29/01/1970

Reflexivity in Film and Culture

Reflexivity in Film and Culture

Author: Robert Stam Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 01/08/1964

Reflexivity refers to those moments in fiction and film when the work suddenly calls attention to itself as a fictional construct. For example, in literature a character might suddenly step out of the story and address the reader. This study of reflexivity in film and literature pays special attention to Don Quixote , one of the first such examples of reflexivity in the novel, and to Jean-Luc Godard and the nouvelle vague in cinema, where self-reflection prevailed. It examines the rise of modernism, the complicity of the reader-spectator in creating illusion and the production process in film. The discussion of film includes Rear Window , Tom Jones and The French Lieutenant's Woman .