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Colonial art

See below for a selection of the latest books from Colonial art category. Presented with a red border are the Colonial art books that have been lovingly read and reviewed by the experts at Lovereading. With expert reading recommendations made by people with a passion for books and some unique features Lovereading will help you find great Colonial art books and those from many more genres to read that will keep you inspired and entertained. And it's all free!

The Politics of Taste Beatriz Gonzalez and Cold War Aesthetics

The Politics of Taste Beatriz Gonzalez and Cold War Aesthetics

Author: Ana Maria Reyes Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 15/11/2019

In The Politics of Taste Ana Maria Reyes examines the works of Colombian artist Beatriz Gonzalez and Argentine-born art critic, Marta Traba, who championed Gonzalez's art during Colombia's National Front coalition government (1958-74). During this critical period in Latin American art, artistic practice, art criticism, and institutional objectives came into strenuous yet productive tension. While Gonzalez's triumphant debut excited critics who wanted to cast Colombian art as modern, sophisticated, and universal, her turn to urban lowbrow culture proved deeply unsettling. Traba praised Gonzalez's cursi (tacky) recycling aesthetic as daringly subversive and her strategic localism as resistant to U.S. cultural imperialism. Reyes reads Gonzalez's and Traba's complex visual and textual production and their intertwined careers against Cold War modernization programs that were deeply embedded in elite fear of the masses and designed to avert Cuban-inspired revolution. In so doing, Reyes provides fresh insights into Colombia's social anxieties and frustrations while highlighting how interrogations of taste became vital expressions of the growing discontent with the Colombian state.

The Politics of Taste Beatriz Gonzalez and Cold War Aesthetics

The Politics of Taste Beatriz Gonzalez and Cold War Aesthetics

Author: Ana Maria Reyes Format: Hardback Release Date: 15/11/2019

In The Politics of Taste Ana Maria Reyes examines the works of Colombian artist Beatriz Gonzalez and Argentine-born art critic, Marta Traba, who championed Gonzalez's art during Colombia's National Front coalition government (1958-74). During this critical period in Latin American art, artistic practice, art criticism, and institutional objectives came into strenuous yet productive tension. While Gonzalez's triumphant debut excited critics who wanted to cast Colombian art as modern, sophisticated, and universal, her turn to urban lowbrow culture proved deeply unsettling. Traba praised Gonzalez's cursi (tacky) recycling aesthetic as daringly subversive and her strategic localism as resistant to U.S. cultural imperialism. Reyes reads Gonzalez's and Traba's complex visual and textual production and their intertwined careers against Cold War modernization programs that were deeply embedded in elite fear of the masses and designed to avert Cuban-inspired revolution. In so doing, Reyes provides fresh insights into Colombia's social anxieties and frustrations while highlighting how interrogations of taste became vital expressions of the growing discontent with the Colombian state.

Quebec Un tableau d'Adam Miller

Quebec Un tableau d'Adam Miller

Author: Clarence Epstein, Francois-Marc Gagnon, Donald Kuspit, Alexandre Turgeon Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 29/08/2019

Le tableau d'Adam Miller intitulee Quebec evoque plus de quatre siecles d'histoire de la province. Representant des personnages politiques quebecois et canadiens identifiables, des gens ordinaires et des figures allegoriques, cette uvre hors du commun aborde de nombreux debats entourant le 150e anniversaire de la Confederation ainsi que le 375e anniversaire de la fondation de Montreal. Rassemblant une collection de commentaires sur cette toile et son artiste, cet ouvrage explore l'experience quebecoise et canadienne ainsi que les liens qui unissent l'art et l'histoire. On y trouve une reproduction du tableau, un assortiment de gros plans, l'identification des personnages representes et des esquisses ayant servi de preparation a l' uvre definitive. En outre, des essais rediges par les historiens de l'art Francois-Marc Gagnon, Donald Kuspit et Alexandre Turgeon incitent a la reflexion sur le tableau et son style, de meme que sur sa representation de l'histoire relativement aux questions de la politique, de l'art et de la memoire collective. L'ouvrage renferme aussi une entrevue avec Adam Miller realisee par Clarence Epstein qui revele les sources d'inspiration de l' uvre et le processus creatif de son auteur. Une preface redigee par le mecene qui a commande la toile vient completer le tout. Adam Miller est un peintre repute pour son style figuratif neo-classique raffine depeignant des sujets historiques et des themes lies a la justice sociale. Il vit a New York.

Terry Adkins Infinity Is Always Less Than One

Terry Adkins Infinity Is Always Less Than One

Author: Gean Moreno Format: Hardback Release Date: 10/07/2019

One of the great conceptual artists of the twenty-first century, Terry Adkins (1953-2014) was renowned for his pioneering work across mediums, from sculpture, drawing, and site-specific installation to photography, video, and performance. Terry Adkins: Infinity is Always Less Than One accompanies the first institutional posthumous exhibition of Adkins's sculptural production. While Adkins is often recognized for his musical and performative practice, this exhibition focuses on his complex memorials and monuments to historical figures. The exhibition showcases four of his major series, dedicated to four distinct figures: Bessie Smith, John Brown, Zora Neale Hurston, and Jimi Hendrix. These series are presented alongside a group of early sculptures to reveal the development of the Adkins's mature practice. The exhibition highlights Adkins's crucial contributions to sculpture and to cultural protest, featuring major works that have not been viewed in decades. It explores significant periods and influences in Adkins's career, beginning with transitional hand-wrought sculptures and continuing with his major immersive installations. His often elegiac and always resonant objects challenge dominant historical narratives and prompt a rethinking of ways of being and moving in the world that are shaped by the legacies of displacement and the sociability and community that happen despite it. Adkins's work also enlarges the historical legacies of the postwar avant-garde while reminding us of the immaterial legacies that are passed on through ritual and sound. Contributors. Alex Gartenfeld, Kobena Mercer, Gean Moreno, Nizan Shaked, and Greg Tate A Publication of ICA Miami Distributed by Duke University Press

Preston Singletary Raven and the Box of Daylight

Preston Singletary Raven and the Box of Daylight

Author: Miranda Belarde-Lewis, John Drury Format: Hardback Release Date: 01/07/2019

The story Raven and the Box of Daylight, which tells how Raven transformed the world and brought light to the people by releasing the stars, moon, and sun, holds great significance to the Tlingit people of the Pacific Northwest Coast. A new body of work by artist Preston Singletary (American, born 1963) will immerse readers in Tlingit traditions by telling this story through his monumental glass works and installations. Primarily known for his celebration of Tlingit art and design, Singletary will explore new ways of working with glass inspired by Tlingit design principles. Tlingit objects were traditionally used to show wealth and tell stories by representing elements of the natural world, as well as the histories of individual families. By drawing upon this tradition, Singletary's art creates a unique theatrical atmosphere, in which the pieces follow and enhance a narrative. This book includes texts that place Singletary's work within the wider histories of both glass art and native arts traditions-especially the art of spoken-word storytelling. Also included are a biography and an interview with the artist.

Becoming Mary Sully Toward an American Indian Abstract

Becoming Mary Sully Toward an American Indian Abstract

Author: Philip J. Deloria Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 01/05/2019

Dakota Sioux artist Mary Sully was the great-granddaughter of respected nineteenth-century portraitist Thomas Sully, who captured the personalities of America's first generation of celebrities (including the figure of Andrew Jackson immortalized on the twenty-dollar bill). Born on the Standing Rock reservation in South Dakota in 1896, she was largely self-taught. Steeped in the visual traditions of beadwork, quilling, and hide painting, she also engaged with the experiments in time, space, symbolism, and representation characteristic of early twentieth-century modernist art. And like her great-grandfather Sully was fascinated by celebrity: over two decades, she produced hundreds of colorful and dynamic abstract triptychs, a series of personality prints of American public figures like Amelia Earhart, Babe Ruth, and Gertrude Stein. Sully's position on the margins of the art world meant that her work was exhibited only a handful of times during her life. In Becoming Mary Sully, Philip J. Deloria reclaims that work from obscurity, exploring her stunning portfolio through the lenses of modernism, industrial design, Dakota women's aesthetics, mental health, ethnography and anthropology, primitivism, and the American Indian politics of the 1930s. Working in a complex territory oscillating between representation, symbolism, and abstraction, Sully evoked multiple and simultaneous perspectives of time and space. With an intimate yet sweeping style, Deloria recovers in Sully's work a move toward an anti-colonial aesthetic that claimed a critical role for Indigenous women in American Indian futures-within and distinct from American modernity and modernism.

Becoming Mary Sully Toward an American Indian Abstract

Becoming Mary Sully Toward an American Indian Abstract

Author: Philip J. Deloria Format: Hardback Release Date: 01/05/2019

Dakota Sioux artist Mary Sully was the great-granddaughter of respected nineteenth-century portraitist Thomas Sully, who captured the personalities of America's first generation of celebrities (including the figure of Andrew Jackson immortalized on the twenty-dollar bill). Born on the Standing Rock reservation in South Dakota in 1896, she was largely self-taught. Steeped in the visual traditions of beadwork, quilling, and hide painting, she also engaged with the experiments in time, space, symbolism, and representation characteristic of early twentieth-century modernist art. And like her great-grandfather Sully was fascinated by celebrity: over two decades, she produced hundreds of colorful and dynamic abstract triptychs, a series of personality prints of American public figures like Amelia Earhart, Babe Ruth, and Gertrude Stein. Sully's position on the margins of the art world meant that her work was exhibited only a handful of times during her life. In Becoming Mary Sully, Philip J. Deloria reclaims that work from obscurity, exploring her stunning portfolio through the lenses of modernism, industrial design, Dakota women's aesthetics, mental health, ethnography and anthropology, primitivism, and the American Indian politics of the 1930s. Working in a complex territory oscillating between representation, symbolism, and abstraction, Sully evoked multiple and simultaneous perspectives of time and space. With an intimate yet sweeping style, Deloria recovers in Sully's work a move toward an anti-colonial aesthetic that claimed a critical role for Indigenous women in American Indian futures-within and distinct from American modernity and modernism.

Galleries of Maoriland Artists, Collectors and the Maori World, 1880-1910

Galleries of Maoriland Artists, Collectors and the Maori World, 1880-1910

Author: Roger Blackley Format: Hardback Release Date: 30/03/2019

Galleries of Maoriland introduces us to the many ways in which Pakeha discovered, created, propagated and romanticised the Maori world at the turn of the century - in the paintings of Lindauer and Goldie, among artists, patrons, collectors and audiences; inside the Polynesian Society and the Dominion Museum; among stolen artefacts and fantastical accounts of the Maori past. The culture of Maoriland was a Pakeha creation. But Galleries of Maoriland shows that Maori were not merely passive victims: they too had a stake in this process of romanticisation. What, this book asks, were some of the Maori purposes that were served by curio displays, portrait collections, and the wider ethnological culture? Why did the idealisation of an ancient Maori world, which obsessed ethnological inquirers and artists alike, appeal also to Maori? Who precisely were the Maori participants in this culture, and what were their motives? Galleries of Maoriland looks at Maori prehistory in Pakeha art; the enthusiasm of Pakeha and Maori for portraiture and recreations of ancient life; the trade in Maori curios; and the international exhibition of this colonial culture. By illuminating New Zealand's artistic and ethnographic economy at the turn of the twentieth century, this book provides a new understanding of our art and our culture.

Creating the Universe Depictions of the Cosmos in Himalayan Buddhism

Creating the Universe Depictions of the Cosmos in Himalayan Buddhism

Author: Eric Huntington Format: Hardback Release Date: 07/03/2019

Winner, 2018 Edward Cameron Dimock, Jr. Prize in the Indian Humanities Buddhist representations of the cosmos across nearly two thousand years of history in Tibet, Nepal, and India show that cosmology is a rich language for the expression of diverse religious ideas, with cosmological thinking at the center of Buddhist thought, art, and practice. In Creating the Universe, Eric Huntington presents examples of visual art and architecture, primary texts, ritual ideologies, and material practices-accompanied by extensive explanatory diagrams-to reveal the immense complexity of cosmological thinking in Himalayan Buddhism. Employing comparisons across function, medium, culture, and history, he exposes cosmology as a fundamental mode of engagement with numerous aspects of religion, from preliminary lessons to the highest rituals for enlightenment. This wide-ranging work will interest scholars and students of many fields, including Buddhist studies, religious studies, art history, and area studies.

Shifting Grounds Landscape in Contemporary Native American Art

Shifting Grounds Landscape in Contemporary Native American Art

Author: Kate Morris Format: Hardback Release Date: 07/03/2019

A distinctly Indigenous form of landscape representation is emerging in the creations of contemporary Indigenous artists from North America. For centuries, landscape painting in European art typically used representational strategies such as single-point perspective to lure viewers-and settlers-into the territories of the old and new worlds. In the twentieth century, abstract expressionism transformed painting to encompass something beyond the visual world, and later, minimalism and the Land Art movement broadened the genre of landscape art to include sculptural forms and site-specific installations. In Shifting Grounds, art historian Kate Morris argues that Indigenous artists are expanding, reconceptualizing, and remaking the forms of the genre still further, expressing Indigenous attitudes toward land and belonging even as they draw upon mainstream art practices. The resulting works are rarely if ever primarily visual representations, but instead evoke all five senses: from the overt sensuality of Kay WalkingStick's tactile paintings to the eerie soundscapes of Alan Michelson's videos and Postcommodity's installations to the immersive environments of Kent Monkman's dioramas, this landscape art resonates with a fully embodied and embedded subjectivity. In the works of these and many other Native artists, Shifting Grounds explores themes of presence and absence, connection and dislocation, survival and vulnerability, memory and commemoration, and power and resistance, illuminating the artists' sustained engagement not only with land and landscape but also with the history of representation itself.

Ethnographic Collecting and African Agency in Early Colonial West Africa A Study of Trans-Imperial Cultural Flows

Ethnographic Collecting and African Agency in Early Colonial West Africa A Study of Trans-Imperial Cultural Flows

Author: Zachary (National Museums Liverpool, UK) Kingdon Format: Hardback Release Date: 21/02/2019

The early collections from Africa in Liverpool's World Museum reflect the city's longstanding shipping and commercial links with Africa's Atlantic coast. A principal component of these collections is an assemblage of several thousand artefacts from western Africa that were transported to institutions in northwest England between 1894 and 1916 by the Liverpool steam ship engineer Arnold Ridyard. While Ridyard's collecting efforts can be seen to have been shaped by the steamers' dynamic capacity to connect widely separated people and places, his Methodist credentials were fundamental in determining the profile of his African networks, because they meant that he was not part of official colonial authority in West Africa. Kingdon's study uncovers the identities of many of Ridyard's numerous West African collaborators and discusses their interests and predicaments under the colonial dispensation. Against this background account, their agendas are examined with reference to surviving narratives that accompanied their donations and within the context of broader processes of trans-imperial exchange, through which they forged new identities and statuses for themselves and attempted to counter expressions of British cultural imperialism in the region. The study concludes with a discussion of the competing meanings assigned to the Ridyard assemblage by the Liverpool Museum and examines the ways in which its re-contextualization in museum contexts helped to efface signs of the energies and narratives behind its creation.