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Colonial art

See below for a selection of the latest books from Colonial art category. Presented with a red border are the Colonial art books that have been lovingly read and reviewed by the experts at Lovereading. With expert reading recommendations made by people with a passion for books and some unique features Lovereading will help you find great Colonial art books and those from many more genres to read that will keep you inspired and entertained. And it's all free!

British Art and the East India Company

British Art and the East India Company

Author: Geoff Quilley Format: Hardback Release Date: 18/09/2020

This book examines the role of the East India Company in the production and development of British art during the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, when a new school of British art was in its formative stages with the foundation of exhibiting societies and the Royal Academy in 1768. It focuses on the Company's patronage, promotion and uses of art, both in Britain and in India and the Far East, and how the Company and its trade with the East were represented visually, through maritime imagery, landscape, genre painting and print-making. It also considers how, for artists such as William Hodges and Arthur William Devis, the East India Company, and its provision of a wealthy market in British India, provided opportunities for career advancement, through alignment with Company commercial principles. In this light, the book's main concern is to address the conflicted and ambiguous nature of art produced in the service of a corporation that was the scandal of empire for most of its existence, and how this has shaped and distorted our understanding of the history of British art in relation to the concomitant rise of Britain as a self-consciously commercial and maritime nation, whose prosperity relied upon global expansion, increasing colonialism and the development of mercantile organisations. GEOFF QUILLEY is Professor of Art History at the University of Sussex, specializing in the relation of British and western visual culture to empire and global expansion in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. He was previously Curator of Fine Art at the National Maritime Museum, London, and has written and edited numerous books, including Empire to Nation: Art, History and the Visualization of Maritime Britain, 1768-1829 (Yale University Press 2011).

one month after being known in that island

one month after being known in that island

Author: Pablo Guardiola, Yina Jimenez Suriel Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 10/09/2020

In the wake of 500 years of colonialism, the Caribbean archipelago remains to this day one of the world's most profoundly fractured regions of the world. Spain, Germany, England, the Netherlands, and the United States claimed various parts of the island group, primarily to assert their economic interests. The resulting mosaic concealed the region's own, non-Eurocentric culture and art. But, now, the social, political, and cultural dynamics are shifting. In partnership with the Basel H. Geiger Cultural Foundation, The Caribbean Art Initiative, which was founded in 2019 to raise international awareness of the rich Caribbean art scene, will present the first large-scale exhibition of contemporary Caribbean art by Caribbean curators in Basel, Switzerland. This companion publication showcases artists from all over the region and its diaspora, making their works broadly accessible and initiating a much-needed conversation about an otherwise overlooked facet of the international community.

Pictured Politics

Pictured Politics

Author: Emily Engel Format: Hardback Release Date: 07/07/2020

The Spanish colonial period in South America saw artists develop the subgenre of official portraiture, or portraits of key individuals in the continent's viceregal governments. Although these portraits appeared to illustrate a narrative of imperial splendor and absolutist governance, they instead became a visual record of the local history that emerged during the colonial occupation. Using the official portrait collections accumulated between 1542 and 1830 in Lima, Buenos Aires, and Bogota as a lens, Pictured Politics explores how official portraiture originated and evolved to become an essential component in the construction of Ibero-American political relationships. Through the surviving portraits and archival evidence-including political treatises, travel accounts, and early periodicals-Emily Engel demonstrates that these official portraits not only belie a singular interpretation as tools of imperial domination but also visualize the continent's multilayered history of colonial occupation. The first stand alone analysis of South American portraiture, Pictured Politics brings to light the historical relevance of political portraits in crafting the history of South American colonialism.

Andres Pereira Paz

Andres Pereira Paz

Author: Bethanien Kunstlerhaus Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 11/05/2020

This book documents the project Radio Carabuco of the Bolivian artist Andres Pereira Paz, which he created during his residency at Kunstlerhaus Bethanien in Berlin. A podcast (www.radiocarabuco.com) developed in collaboration with international artists, researchers, and activists forms the centerpiece of the project. Pereira Paz's critical reflections were inspired by Jose Lopez de los Rios's painting of a vision of hell, commissioned by the Catholic Church during the colonial era. Created in the Andes town of Carabuco in 1664, the work is still on display at the local church. Like many paintings from that period, the Christian motif was brought to Latin America by the Spanish colonial rulers to convert the indigenous population from paganism to Christianity and to peddle propaganda for Catholicism's message of salvation. The episodes of Pereira Paz's podcast investigate the methods and consequences of religious and cultural colonialism and scrutinise various political and societal perspectives, in particular with regard to his native country of Bolivia. The rejection and suppression of everything that is perceived as 'other' is a key theme of his work, which also addresses the question of whether the traditional Western idea of 'hell' has potentially become a symbolic place of active resistance against propaganda, censorship, and discrimination that should be defended as effectively as possible.

Photographic Returns

Photographic Returns

Author: Shawn Michelle Smith Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 03/01/2020

In Photographic Returns Shawn Michelle Smith traces how historical moments of racial crisis come to be known photographically and how the past continues to inhabit, punctuate, and transform the present through the photographic medium in contemporary art. Smith engages photographs by Rashid Johnson, Sally Mann, Deborah Luster, Lorna Simpson, Jason Lazarus, Carrie Mae Weems, Taryn Simon, and Dawoud Bey, among others. Each of these artists turns to the past-whether by using nineteenth-century techniques to produce images or by re-creating iconic historic photographs-as a way to use history to negotiate the present and to call attention to the unfinished political project of racial justice in the United States. By interrogating their use of photography to recall, revise, and amplify the relationship between racial politics of the past and present, Smith locates a temporal recursivity that is intrinsic to photography, in which images return to haunt the viewer and prompt reflection on the present and an imagination of a more just future.

Photographic Returns

Photographic Returns

Author: Shawn Michelle Smith Format: Hardback Release Date: 03/01/2020

In Photographic Returns Shawn Michelle Smith traces how historical moments of racial crisis come to be known photographically and how the past continues to inhabit, punctuate, and transform the present through the photographic medium in contemporary art. Smith engages photographs by Rashid Johnson, Sally Mann, Deborah Luster, Lorna Simpson, Jason Lazarus, Carrie Mae Weems, Taryn Simon, and Dawoud Bey, among others. Each of these artists turns to the past-whether by using nineteenth-century techniques to produce images or by re-creating iconic historic photographs-as a way to use history to negotiate the present and to call attention to the unfinished political project of racial justice in the United States. By interrogating their use of photography to recall, revise, and amplify the relationship between racial politics of the past and present, Smith locates a temporal recursivity that is intrinsic to photography, in which images return to haunt the viewer and prompt reflection on the present and an imagination of a more just future.

Between Form and Content

Between Form and Content

Author: Julie Levin Caro, Jeff Arnal Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 07/10/2019

Quebec

Quebec

Author: Clarence Epstein, Francois-Marc Gagnon, Donald Kuspit, Alexandre Turgeon Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 12/09/2019

Le tableau d'Adam Miller intitulee Quebec evoque plus de quatre siecles d'histoire de la province. Representant des personnages politiques quebecois et canadiens identifiables, des gens ordinaires et des figures allegoriques, cette oeuvre hors du commun aborde de nombreux debats entourant le 150e anniversaire de la Confederation ainsi que le 375e anniversaire de la fondation de Montreal. Rassemblant une collection de commentaires sur cette toile et son artiste, cet ouvrage explore l'experience quebecoise et canadienne ainsi que les liens qui unissent l'art et l'histoire. On y trouve une reproduction du tableau, un assortiment de gros plans, l'identification des personnages representes et des esquisses ayant servi de preparation a l'oeuvre definitive. En outre, des essais rediges par les historiens de l'art Francois-Marc Gagnon, Donald Kuspit et Alexandre Turgeon incitent a la reflexion sur le tableau et son style, de meme que sur sa representation de l'histoire relativement aux questions de la politique, de l'art et de la memoire collective. L'ouvrage renferme aussi une entrevue avec Adam Miller realisee par Clarence Epstein qui revele les sources d'inspiration de l'oeuvre et le processus creatif de son auteur. Une preface redigee par le mecene qui a commande la toile vient completer le tout. Adam Miller est un peintre repute pour son style figuratif neo-classique raffine depeignant des sujets historiques et des themes lies a la justice sociale. Il vit a New York.

Preston Singletary

Preston Singletary

Author: Miranda Belarde-Lewis, John Drury Format: Hardback Release Date: 01/07/2019

The story Raven and the Box of Daylight, which tells how Raven transformed the world and brought light to the people by releasing the stars, moon, and sun, holds great significance to the Tlingit people of the Pacific Northwest Coast. A new body of work by artist Preston Singletary (American, born 1963) will immerse readers in Tlingit traditions by telling this story through his monumental glass works and installations. Primarily known for his celebration of Tlingit art and design, Singletary will explore new ways of working with glass inspired by Tlingit design principles. Tlingit objects were traditionally used to show wealth and tell stories by representing elements of the natural world, as well as the histories of individual families. By drawing upon this tradition, Singletary's art creates a unique theatrical atmosphere, in which the pieces follow and enhance a narrative. This book includes texts that place Singletary's work within the wider histories of both glass art and native arts traditions-especially the art of spoken-word storytelling. Also included are a biography and an interview with the artist.

Terry Adkins

Terry Adkins

Author: Gean Moreno Format: Hardback Release Date: 15/06/2019

One of the great conceptual artists of the twenty-first century, Terry Adkins (1953-2014) was renowned for his pioneering work across mediums, from sculpture, drawing, and site-specific installation to photography, video, and performance. Terry Adkins: Infinity is Always Less Than One accompanies the first institutional posthumous exhibition of Adkins's sculptural production. While Adkins is often recognized for his musical and performative practice, this exhibition focuses on his complex memorials and monuments to historical figures. The exhibition showcases four of his major series, dedicated to four distinct figures: Bessie Smith, John Brown, Zora Neale Hurston, and Jimi Hendrix. These series are presented alongside a group of early sculptures to reveal the development of the Adkins's mature practice. The exhibition highlights Adkins's crucial contributions to sculpture and to cultural protest, featuring major works that have not been viewed in decades. It explores significant periods and influences in Adkins's career, beginning with transitional hand-wrought sculptures and continuing with his major immersive installations. His often elegiac and always resonant objects challenge dominant historical narratives and prompt a rethinking of ways of being and moving in the world that are shaped by the legacies of displacement and the sociability and community that happen despite it. Adkins's work also enlarges the historical legacies of the postwar avant-garde while reminding us of the immaterial legacies that are passed on through ritual and sound. Contributors. Alex Gartenfeld, Kobena Mercer, Gean Moreno, Nizan Shaked, and Greg Tate A Publication of ICA Miami Distributed by Duke University Press

Becoming Mary Sully

Becoming Mary Sully

Author: Philip J. Deloria Format: Hardback Release Date: 24/04/2019

Dakota Sioux artist Mary Sully was the great-granddaughter of respected nineteenth-century portraitist Thomas Sully, who captured the personalities of America's first generation of celebrities (including the figure of Andrew Jackson immortalized on the twenty-dollar bill). Born on the Standing Rock reservation in South Dakota in 1896, she was largely self-taught. Steeped in the visual traditions of beadwork, quilling, and hide painting, she also engaged with the experiments in time, space, symbolism, and representation characteristic of early twentieth-century modernist art. And like her great-grandfather Sully was fascinated by celebrity: over two decades, she produced hundreds of colorful and dynamic abstract triptychs, a series of personality prints of American public figures like Amelia Earhart, Babe Ruth, and Gertrude Stein. Sully's position on the margins of the art world meant that her work was exhibited only a handful of times during her life. In Becoming Mary Sully, Philip J. Deloria reclaims that work from obscurity, exploring her stunning portfolio through the lenses of modernism, industrial design, Dakota women's aesthetics, mental health, ethnography and anthropology, primitivism, and the American Indian politics of the 1930s. Working in a complex territory oscillating between representation, symbolism, and abstraction, Sully evoked multiple and simultaneous perspectives of time and space. With an intimate yet sweeping style, Deloria recovers in Sully's work a move toward an anti-colonial aesthetic that claimed a critical role for Indigenous women in American Indian futures-within and distinct from American modernity and modernism.

Becoming Mary Sully

Becoming Mary Sully

Author: Philip J. Deloria Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 24/04/2019

Dakota Sioux artist Mary Sully was the great-granddaughter of respected nineteenth-century portraitist Thomas Sully, who captured the personalities of America's first generation of celebrities (including the figure of Andrew Jackson immortalized on the twenty-dollar bill). Born on the Standing Rock reservation in South Dakota in 1896, she was largely self-taught. Steeped in the visual traditions of beadwork, quilling, and hide painting, she also engaged with the experiments in time, space, symbolism, and representation characteristic of early twentieth-century modernist art. And like her great-grandfather Sully was fascinated by celebrity: over two decades, she produced hundreds of colorful and dynamic abstract triptychs, a series of personality prints of American public figures like Amelia Earhart, Babe Ruth, and Gertrude Stein. Sully's position on the margins of the art world meant that her work was exhibited only a handful of times during her life. In Becoming Mary Sully, Philip J. Deloria reclaims that work from obscurity, exploring her stunning portfolio through the lenses of modernism, industrial design, Dakota women's aesthetics, mental health, ethnography and anthropology, primitivism, and the American Indian politics of the 1930s. Working in a complex territory oscillating between representation, symbolism, and abstraction, Sully evoked multiple and simultaneous perspectives of time and space. With an intimate yet sweeping style, Deloria recovers in Sully's work a move toward an anti-colonial aesthetic that claimed a critical role for Indigenous women in American Indian futures-within and distinct from American modernity and modernism.