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The Chester & Holyhead Railway The Modern Scene

by Richard Billingsley

The Chester & Holyhead Railway The Modern Scene Synopsis

Although perhaps overshadowed by the fame of the Great Western Railway's sea wall section of railway west of Exeter, the Chester & Holyhead Railway, opened in full by 1850, has much to offer as it wends its way west. Passing the mudflats of the Dee Estuary and onto the coast of the Irish Sea for much of the 40 miles from Mostyn to Bangor, the line bisects huge holiday parks, cuts through a walled town and medieval castle and runs the entire length of an island separate from the mainland before terminating at the famous port. Here, author Richard Billingsley shows the reader and possible visitors to the North Wales Coast Main Line what the modern railway scene has to offer, and the scenery that it takes place in.

Book Information

ISBN: 9781445685250
Publication date: 15th December 2018
Author: Richard Billingsley
Publisher: Amberley Publishing
Format: Paperback / softback
Pagination: 96 pages
Categories: Trains & railways: general interest, Local history,

About Richard Billingsley

Richard Billingsley was first called to the railway in 1975 as a 9 year old lad, fascinated by the bells and clunks from a Great Western era signalbox. Relocating to North Wales in the early 2000s, the author has created an extensive record of the modern history of the line across the North Wales coast. Bored of the increasingly sterile UK railscene, he first discovered the American railroad during a family holiday to Florida in 2008. Immediately captivated, he's returned to capture the scene over a dozen times since, photographing the railroad in more than 20 states. And, if he's learnt anything, it's that ...

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