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Stalin's World War II Evacuations Triumph and Troubles in Kirov by Larry E. Holmes
  

Stalin's World War II Evacuations Triumph and Troubles in Kirov

Part of the Modern War Studies Series

RRP £41.50

Synopsis

Stalin's World War II Evacuations Triumph and Troubles in Kirov by Larry E. Holmes

In the face of the German onslaught in World War II, the Soviets succeeded, as Molotov later recalled, in relocating to the rear virtually an entire industrial country. It was an official declared one of the greatest feats of the war. Focusing on the Kirov region, this book offers a different and considerably more nuanced picture of the evacuations than the typical triumphal narrative found in Soviet history. In its depiction of the complexities of the displacement and relocation of populations, Stalin's World War II Evacuations also has remarkable relevance in our time of mass migrations of refugees from war-torn nations.

Reviews

Holmes tells a riveting story of the evacuation of 1,500 factories and hundreds of thousands of citizens into the Soviet rear following the German attack in summer 1941. The narrative is easy to follow--an extraordinary story of courage and survival side-by-side with tragic suffering that Soviet civilians endured during the war years. There have been in recent years a handful of books purporting to tell the story of the evacuations, but this book is by far the very best because of Holmes
astounding research base: years of work in central and regional archives

, libraries and other local collections supplemented by interviews. It will attract a wide readership. --Jeffrey Burds, professor of history, Northeastern University An extraordinarily valuable study. It's a great compliment to Manley and Stronski's work on the wartime evacuations to Central Asia; a fine-grained analysis with a clear eye for the power politics involved in evacuation. Its focus on different types of institutions such as factories, offices, schools and orphanages creates a remarkable holistic picture of the evacuation and war years in Kirov with its refugees, hunger, epidemics, deprivation, and incredible grittiness. In addition, Holmes
work is so well researched and so capacious in it subjects, that it easily should go down as one of our finer regional studies. It gives a whole new depth to the tired cliche of home front and an insight to just what the Soviet civilians far from the front endured

. --Matthew J. Payne, author of Stalin's Railroad: Turksib and the Building of Socialism Larry Holmes tells a gripping tale of the rescue, evacuation, and resettlement of Soviet industry and people during World War II from the frontline territories soon to be overrun by the Nazis. He takes us to the northern industrial town of Kirov, to reveal in heartbreaking detail the difficulties of life on the home front for both evacuees and the local population. Holmes describes not only how tens of thousands of evacuees were welcomed, housed, and fed, but also the more painful side of resettlement: struggles over food, space, and control. His book contains valuable lessons for a contemporary world once again facing a vast refugee crisis amid the horrors of war and mass displacement. --Wendy Z. Goldman, Paul Mellon Distinguished Professor of History, Carnegie Mellon University Holmes provides a much-needed (and still relevant) analysis of the problems engendered by the mass migrations of peoples and the tensions that inevitably arise between hosts and refugees (or, in this case, evacuees), as well as a nuanced explication of the political conflicts between the center and the periphery that does much to reveal the nature of the Soviet regime in both war and peace. Highly recommended. --Choice -An extraordinarily valuable study. It's a great compliment to Manley and Stronski's work on the wartime evacuations to Central Asia; a fine-grained analysis with a clear eye for the power politics involved in evacuation. Its focus on different types of institutions such as factories, offices, schools and orphanages creates a remarkable holistic picture of the evacuation and war years in Kirov with its refugees, hunger, epidemics, deprivation, and incredible grittiness. In addition, Holmes
work is so well researched and so capacious in it subjects, that it easily should go down as one of our finer regional studies. It gives a whole new depth to the tired cliche of

-home front- and an insight to just what the Soviet civilians far from the front endured.---Matthew J. Payne, author of Stalin's Railroad: Turksib and the Building of Socialism -Larry Holmes tells a gripping tale of the rescue, evacuation, and resettlement of Soviet industry and people during World War II from the frontline territories soon to be overrun by the Nazis. He takes us to the northern industrial town of Kirov, to reveal in heartbreaking detail the difficulties of life on the home front for both evacuees and the local population. Holmes describes not only how tens of thousands of evacuees were welcomed, housed, and fed, but also the more painful side of resettlement: struggles over food, space, and control. His book contains valuable lessons for a contemporary world once again facing a vast refugee crisis amid the horrors of war and mass displacement.---Wendy Z. Goldman, Paul Mellon Distinguished Professor of History, Carnegie Mellon University -Holmes tells a riveting story of the evacuation of 1,500 factories and hundreds of thousands of citizens into the Soviet rear following the German attack in summer 1941. The narrative is easy to follow--an extraordinary story of courage and survival side-by-side with tragic suffering that Soviet civilians endured during the war years. There have been in recent years a handful of books purporting to tell the story of the evacuations, but this book is by far the very best because of Holmes
astounding research base: years of work in central and regional archives

, libraries and other local collections supplemented by interviews. It will attract a wide readership.---Jeffrey Burds, professor of history, Northeastern University -An extraordinarily valuable study. It's a great compliment to Manley and Stronski's work on the wartime evacuations to Central Asia; a fine-grained analysis with a clear eye for the power politics involved in evacuation. Its focus on different types of institutions such as factories, offices, schools and orphanages creates a remarkable holistic picture of the evacuation and war years in Kirov with its refugees, hunger, epidemics, deprivation, and incredible grittiness. In addition, Holmes
work is so well researched and so capacious in it subjects, that it easily should go down as one of our finer regional studies. It gives a whole new depth to the tired cliche of

-home front- and an insight to just what the Soviet civilians far from the front endured.---Matthew J. Payne, author of Stalin's Railroad: Turksib and the Building of Socialism -Larry Holmes tells a gripping tale of the rescue, evacuation, and resettlement of Soviet industry and people during World War II from the frontline territories soon to be overrun by the Nazis. He takes us to the northern industrial town of Kirov, to reveal in heartbreaking detail the difficulties of life on the home front for both evacuees and the local population. Holmes describes not only how tens of thousands of evacuees were welcomed, housed, and fed, but also the more painful side of resettlement: struggles over food, space, and control. His book contains valuable lessons for a contemporary world once again facing a vast refugee crisis amid the horrors of war and mass displacement.---Wendy Z. Goldman, Paul Mellon Distinguished Professor of History, Carnegie Mellon University Larry Holmes tells a gripping tale of the rescue, evacuation, and resettlement of Soviet industry and people during World War II from the frontline territories soon to be overrun by the Nazis. He takes us to the northern industrial town of Kirov, to reveal in heartbreaking detail the difficulties of life on the home front for both evacuees and the local population. Holmes describes not only how tens of thousands of evacuees were welcomed, housed, and fed, but also the more painful side of resettlement: struggles over food, space, and control. His book contains valuable lessons for a contemporary world once again facing a vast refugee crisis amid the horrors of war and mass displacement. --Wendy Z. Goldman, Paul Mellon Distinguished Professor of History, Carnegie Mellon University An extraordinarily valuable study. It's a great compliment to Manley and Stronski's work on the wartime evacuations to Central Asia; a fine-grained analysis with a clear eye for the power politics involved in evacuation. Its focus on different types of institutions such as factories, offices, schools and orphanages creates a remarkable holistic picture of the evacuation and war years in Kirov with its refugees, hunger, epidemics, deprivation, and incredible grittiness. In addition, Holmes
work is so well researched and so capacious in it subjects, that it easily should go down as one of our finer regional studies. It gives a whole new depth to the tired cliche of home front and an insight to just what the Soviet civilians far from the front endured

. --Matthew J. Payne, author of Stalin's Railroad: Turksib and the Building of Socialism Holmes tells a riveting story of the evacuation of 1,500 factories and hundreds of thousands of citizens into the Soviet rear following the German attack in summer 1941. The narrative is easy to follow an extraordinary story of courage and survival side-by-side with tragic suffering that Soviet civilians endured during the war years. There have been in recent years a handful of books purporting to tell the story of the evacuations, but this book is by far the very best because of Holmes astounding research base: years of work in central and regional archives, libraries and other local collections supplemented by interviews. It will attract a wide readership. Jeffrey Burds, professor of history, Northeastern University An extraordinarily valuable study. It s a great compliment to Manley and Stronski s work on the wartime evacuations to Central Asia; a fine-grained analysis with a clear eye for the power politics involved in evacuation. Its focus on different types of institutions such as factories, offices, schools and orphanages creates a remarkable holistic picture of the evacuation and war years in Kirov with its refugees, hunger, epidemics, deprivation, and incredible grittiness. In addition, Holmes work is so well researched and so capacious in it subjects, that it easily should go down as one of our finer regional studies. It gives a whole new depth to the tired cliche of home front and an insight to just what the Soviet civilians far from the front endured. Matthew J. Payne, author of Stalin s Railroad: Turksib and the Building of Socialism Larry Holmes tells a gripping tale of the rescue, evacuation, and resettlement of Soviet industry and people during World War II from the frontline territories soon to be overrun by the Nazis. He takes us to the northern industrial town of Kirov, to reveal in heartbreaking detail the difficulties of life on the home front for both evacuees and the local population. Holmes describes not only how tens of thousands of evacuees were welcomed, housed, and fed, but also the more painful side of resettlement: struggles over food, space, and control. His book contains valuable lessons for a contemporary world once again facing a vast refugee crisis amid the horrors of war and mass displacement. Wendy Z. Goldman, Paul Mellon Distinguished Professor of History, Carnegie Mellon University


About the Author

Larry E. Holmes is Professor Emeritus of History at the University of South Alabama. He is the author of many books, including Grand Theater: Regional Governance in Stalin's Russia, 1931-1941 and War, Evacuation, and the Exercise of Power: The Center, Periphery, and Kirov's Pedagogical Institute, 1941-1952.

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Book Info

Publication date

13th February 2017

Author

Larry E. Holmes

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    recommendations

Publisher

University Press of Kansas

Format

Hardback
240 pages

Categories

Second World War

ISBN

9780700623952

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