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Choosing White-Collar Crime by Neal Shover, Andrew Hochstetler


Choosing White-Collar Crime by Neal Shover, Andrew Hochstetler

For more than three decades, rational-choice theory has reigned as the dominant approach both for interpreting crime and as underpinning for crime-control programs. Although it has been applied to an array of street crimes, white-collar crime and those who commit it have thus far received less attention. Choosing White-Collar Crime is a systematic application of rational-choice theory to problems of explaining and controlling white-collar crime. It distinguishes ordinary and upperworld white-collar crime and presents reasons theoretically for believing that both have increased substantially in recent decades. Reasons for the increase include the growing supply of white-collar lure and non-credible oversight. Choosing White-Collar Crime also examines criminal decision making by white-collar criminals and their criminal careers. The book concludes with reasons for believing that problems of white-collar crime will continue unchecked in the increasingly global economy and calls for strengthened citizen movements to rein in the increases.


This well-written and well-researched book contributes to the understanding of an important neglected topic.

-Choice Choosing White-Collar Crime is a valuable book.

-Eric R. Cheney, American Journal of Sociology [...]laudable attention paid to differences in pursuing street crime vs 'suite crime.

-Future Survey

About the Author

Neal Shover is Professor of Sociology at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville where he teaches courses in criminology, white-collar crime and criminal justice. He is author of A Sociology of American Corrections (1979), Aging Criminals (1985), (with Donald A. Clelland and John P. Lynxwiler) Enforcement or Negotiation? Constructing a Regulatory Bureaucracy (1986), (with Werner Einstadter) Analyzing American Corrections (1989), Great Pretenders: Pursuits and Careers of Persistent Thieves (1996) and co-editor (with John Paul Wright) of Crimes of Privilege (2000). His work has appeared in Social Forces, Social Problems, the British Journal of Criminology, Criminology, Crime, Law and Social Change and numerous edited collections. Andy Hochstetler is Assistant Professor of Sociology at Iowa State University where he teaches courses on crime at the graduate and undergraduate levels as well as a course on inequality and stratification. He writes on white-collar crime, prisoners, criminal decision making and recidivism. His work has appeared in numerous edited collections and journals including Criminology, Social Problems, the Journal of Contemporary Ethnography, Crime and Delinquency, Justice Quarterly, the Journal of Criminal Justice, Deviant Behavior and Crime, Law and Social Change.

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Book Info

Publication date

14th November 2005


Neal Shover, Andrew Hochstetler

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Cambridge University Press


232 pages


Crime & criminology



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