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The Boethian Commentaries of Clarembald of Arras

by John R. Fortin

Part of the Notre Dame Texts in Medieval Culture Series

The Boethian Commentaries of Clarembald of Arras Synopsis

David George and John Fortin, O.S.B., offer students and scholars the first modern-language translation of commentaries by twelfth-century arts master Clarembald of Arras on two works by the Roman philosopher Boethius (480-524): De Hebdomadibus and De Trinitate. This useful volume also includes extensive notes and a helpful introduction discussing the biography of Clarembald, his writings, and his Latin style. The Boethian Commentaries of Clarembald of Arras reveal that Clarembald, a student of Thierry of Chartres and Hugh of St. Victor, often departed from the style of the straightforward commentaries of his masters. It also shows that Clarembald used his commentaries to defend the Church from misconceptions and heresies that were considered a threat to orthodoxy during his time. This welcome translation is an invaluable resource for anyone with an interest in medieval philosophy and theology.

The Boethian Commentaries of Clarembald of Arras Press Reviews

Well-grounded in the most up-to-date materials relating to Boethius and his medieval commentators, this book is of great assistance for the study of twelfth-century theology. - Stephen F. Brown Boston College

Book Information

ISBN: 9780268021689
Publication date: 31st October 2002
Author: John R. Fortin
Publisher: University of Notre Dame Press
Format: Hardback
Pagination: 216 pages
Categories: Literary studies: classical, early & medieval, Western philosophy: Medieval & Renaissance, c 500 to c 1600, Literary essays, Christianity,

About John R. Fortin

David B. George is professor and chair of classics at Saint Anselm College. John R. Fortin, O.S.B., is a Benedictine monk of Saint Anselm Abbey in Manchester, New Hampshire, an associate professor of philosophy at Saint Anselm College, and director of the Institute for Saint Anselm Studies.

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