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The Oxford Handbook of Cuneiform Culture

by Karen (Reader in Ancient Near Eastern History, University College London) Radner

Part of the Oxford Handbooks Series

The Oxford Handbook of Cuneiform Culture Synopsis

The cuneiform script, the writing system of ancient Mesopotamia, was witness to one of the world's oldest literate cultures. For over three millennia, it was the vehicle of communication from (at its greatest extent) Iran to the Mediterranean, Anatolia to Egypt. The Oxford Handbook of Cuneiform Culture examines the Ancient Middle East through the lens of cuneiform writing. The contributors, a mix of scholars from across the disciplines, explore, define, and to some extent look beyond the boundaries of the written word, using Mesopotamia's clay tablets and stone inscriptions not just as 'texts' but also as material artefacts that offer much additional information about their creators, readers, users and owners.

The Oxford Handbook of Cuneiform Culture Press Reviews

Review from previous edition Thanks are due to the K. Radner and E. Robson for the care with which they edited this voluminous book. * Bibliotheca Orientalis *

Book Information

ISBN: 9780198856030
Publication date: 10th March 2020
Author: Karen (Reader in Ancient Near Eastern History, University College London) Radner
Publisher: Oxford University Press
Format: Paperback / softback
Pagination: 848 pages
Categories: Palaeography (history of writing), Social & cultural history,

About Karen (Reader in Ancient Near Eastern History, University College London) Radner

Karen Radner (PhD Vienna 1997, Habilation Munich 2004) is the Alexander von Humboldt Professor for Ancient History of the Near and Middle East at LMU Munich. Her main research interests are in Assyria, especially the period from the 9th to the 7th centuries BC, on whose political, social, economic, legal, and religious history she has published extensively. Her books include editions of Middle and Neo-Assyrian archives and a study on how awareness of man's mortality shaped Mesopotamian culture (Die Macht des Namens: altorientalische Strategien zur Selbsterhaltung, 2005). She directs an AHRC-funded research project on the correspondence between the Assyrian kings and their magnates ...

More About Karen (Reader in Ancient Near Eastern History, University College London) Radner

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