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The Village of Stepanchikovo And its Inhabitants: from the Notes of an Unknown

by Fyodor Dostoyevsky, Ignat Avsey

The Village of Stepanchikovo And its Inhabitants: from the Notes of an Unknown Synopsis

Summoned to the country estate of his wealthy uncle Colonel Yegor Rostanev, the young student Sergey Aleksandrovich finds himself thrown into a startling bedlam. For as he soon sees, his meek and kind-hearted uncle is wholly dominated by a pretentious and despotic pseudo-intellectual named Opiskin, a charlatan who has ingratiated himself with Yegor's mother and now holds the entire household under his thumb. Watching the absurd theatrics of this domestic tyrant over forty-eight explosive hours, Sergey grows increasingly furious - until at last, he feels compelled to act. A compelling comic exploration of petty tyranny, The Village of Stepanchikovo reveals a delight in life's wild absurdities that rivals even Gogol's. It also offers a fascinating insight into the genesis of the characters and situations of many of Dostoyevsky's great later novels, including The Idiot, Devils and The Brothers Karamazov.

Book Information

ISBN: 9780140446586
Publication date: 29th June 1995
Author: Fyodor Dostoyevsky, Ignat Avsey
Publisher: Penguin Classics an imprint of Penguin Books Ltd
Format: Paperback
Pagination: 224 pages
Categories: Classic fiction (pre c 1945),

About Fyodor Dostoyevsky, Ignat Avsey

Fyodor Dostoevsky (1821-1881) was a Russian novelist, journalist, short-story writer whose psychological penetration into the human soul had a profound influence on the 20th century novel. Notes from the Underground was followed by Crime and Punishment, (1866) an account of an individual's fall and redemption, The Idiot, (1868) depicting a Christ-like figure, Prince Myshkin, and The Possessed, (1871) an exploration of philosophical nihilism. Translated with an introduction by Ignat Avsey

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