The Enchantress Of Florence

by Salman Rushdie

eBooks of the Month Modern and Classic Literary Fiction

LoveReading View on The Enchantress Of Florence

Appeared on “Hay-on-Sky” 24 May. This is the Booker prize winner's 10th book and carries on analysing the relationship between East and West. This time through 16th century Mughal emperor Akbar in his glorious palace complex at Fatehpur Sikri. It is a complex multi layered story that takes effort to read but is well worth it.

The Enchantress Of Florence Synopsis

A tall, yellow-haired young European traveller calling himself 'Mogor dell’Amore', the Mughal of Love, arrives at the court of the real Grand Mughal, the Emperor Akbar, with a tale to tell that begins to obsess the whole imperial capital. The stranger claims to be the child of a lost Mughal princess, the youngest sister of Akbar’s grandfather Babar: Qara Köz, 'Lady Black Eyes', a great beauty believed to possess powers of enchantment and sorcery, who is taken captive first by an Uzbeg warlord, then by the Shah of Persia, and finally becomes the lover of a certain Argalia, a Florentine soldier of fortune, commander of the armies of the Ottoman Sultan. When Argalia returns home with his Mughal mistress the city is mesmerized by her presence, and much trouble ensues.

The Enchantress of Florence is the story of a woman attempting to command her own destiny in a man’s world. It brings together two cities that barely know each other - the hedonistic Mughal capital, in which the brilliant emperor wrestles daily with questions of belief, desire and the treachery of sons, and the equally sensual Florentine world of powerful courtesans, humanist philosophy and inhuman torture, where Argalia’s boyhood friend “il Machia” - Niccolò Machiavelli - is learning, the hard way, about the true brutality of power. These two worlds, so far apart, turn out to be uncannily alike, and the enchantments of women hold sway over them both.

But is Mogor’s story true? And if so, then what happened to the lost princess? And if he’s a liar, must he die?

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All versions of this book

ISBN: 9780224061636
Publication date: 03/04/2008
Publisher: Vintage
Format: Hardback

Book Information

ISBN: 9780224061636
Publication date: 3rd April 2008
Author: Salman Rushdie
Publisher: Vintage
Format: Hardback
Genres: eBook Favourites, Literary Fiction,
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About Salman Rushdie

Sir Salman Rushdie was born in Bombay (now Mumbai) on 19 June 1947. He went to school in Bombay and at Rugby in England, and read History at King's College, Cambridge, where he joined the Cambridge Footlights theatre company. After graduating, he lived with his family who had moved to Pakistan in 1964, and worked briefly in television before returning to England, beginning work as a copywriter for an advertising agency. His first novel, Grimus, was published in 1975. His second novel, the acclaimed Midnight's Children, was published in 1981. It won the Booker Prize for Fiction, the James Tait Black Memorial Prize (for fiction), ...

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