Come Back to Afghanistan

by Said Hyder Akbar, Susan Burton

Biography / Autobiography The Real World Travel

LoveReading View on Come Back to Afghanistan

When he was 17, post 9/11, Said's father returned to Afgahistan as the new president's chief spokesman. The boy had never visited his homeland. Here he gives a fresh, candid appraidal of all aspects of the country. Much praised.

Sarah Broadhurst

Come Back to Afghanistan Synopsis

Said Hyder Akbar’s ordinary suburban Californian life was turned upside-down after September 11th. Hyder’s father, a scion of an Afghan political family, left for Afghanistan to become the new president’s chief spokesman and later the governor of Kunar, a rural province. Obsessed since childhood with a country he had never visited, seventeen-year-old Hyder convinced his father to let him join him. Working alongside his father at the presidential palace and in Kunar gave Hyder a unique perspective on the creation of democratic government in Afghanistan.

In Come Back to Afghanistan, Hyder interweaves his personal journey — that of a teenager struggling to find his identity in his parents’ homeland — with his travels, which take him from palaces to prisons and from Kabul to the borderlands, to give a dramatic account of political and civilian life in post-Taliban Afghanistan.

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All versions of this book

ISBN: 9780747583660
Publication date: 03/07/2006
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing Plc
Format: Paperback

Book Information

ISBN: 9780747583660
Publication date: 3rd July 2006
Author: Said Hyder Akbar, Susan Burton
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing Plc
Format: Paperback
Pagination: 432 pages
Genres: Biography / Autobiography, The Real World, Travel,
Categories: Travel writing,

About Said Hyder Akbar, Susan Burton

Said Hyder Akbar is currently a college student. He is also the co-director and founder of his own non-governmental organisation, Wadan Afghanistan, which has rebuilt schools and constructed pipe systems in rural Kunar province.Susan Burton is a contributing editor of This American Life, and a former editor at Harper’s. Her writing appears in the New York Times Magazine.

More About Said Hyder Akbar, Susan Burton

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