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Littlejohn's Lost World by Richard Littlejohn

Littlejohn's Lost World

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Sue Baker's view...

Born in the early 1950’s, Richard Littlejohn, experienced childhood without computers and wall-to-wall TV and had the freedom to roam in town or country. Now, when parents would be prosecuted for allowing their children this degree of liberty he asks how have we come to this? Littlejohn’s Lost World is a look back to his own childhood and times, the changes, the differences in culture, experience and social icons, better or worse it was a very different world.

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Littlejohn's Lost World by Richard Littlejohn

One of Britain's most successful, controversial columnists looks back on his childhood and how we got from there to here. Richard Littlejohn was born in Ilford, Essex in 1954. It wasn't just another century, it was another country. Wartime rationing was still in force. Children who grew up in the Fifties and Sixties ran free and wild. They were always outdoors and played in cornfields, on building sites and in air raid shelters. There was no suffocating elf'n'safety culture, no computer games and no-one suffered from now-fashionable food allergies. Milk came from cows at the local dairy, not supermarkets. Beef dripping was good for you. Holidays meant a trip to Southend in a Ford Anglia, which went from 0-60 in about three weeks. Instead of the internet, there were libraries. Instead of 24-hour satellite television, there was the anarchic free-for-all of Saturday morning pictures and the Under The Bedclothes Club on Radio Luxembourg. Sherbet lemons, Jubblies and even National Health orange juice contributed to widespread tooth decay. A visit to the school dentist was like entering Torquemada's torture chamber. Men and boys all wore shirts and ties, even at weekends. Families looked after their own. Divorce was uncommon, immigration was minimal. Richard revisits childhood haunts, encountering an England changed beyond recognition - from the covered market which is now a 30-storey Dubai-style tower block to his old primary school, where pupils now speak 20 different languages as their mother tongue. His old grammar school has been abolished and demolished. From Muffin the Mule to Jimi Hendrix at the Isle of Wight Festival in 1970, this book is part memoir, part social documentary. Poignant, warm and funny, it really is a journey to a Lost World.

About the Author

Richard Littlejohn is an award-winning journalist and broadcaster, and author of two best-selling books. He has written for London's Evening Standard and Punch and is still a contributor to the Spectator. His twice-weekly columns in the Daily Mail and the Sun earned him a place in the inaugural Newspaper Hall of Fame as one of the most influential journalists of the past 40 years. He has been Fleet Street's Columnist of the Year and was named Irritant of the Year by the BBC's What The Papers Say awards for his unrivalled ability to get up the noses of the Establishment. His extensive radio and television work has brought him both a Sony award and a Silver Rose of Montreux. Littlejohn's satirical novel To Hell In A Handcart was released in 2001. His highly acclaimed non-fiction book You Couldn't Make It Up (1995) skewered John Major's Conservative government - much the same as Littlejohn's Britain (2007) did for the Blair years, and Littlejohn's House of Fun (2010) for thirteen years of Labour government.

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Book Info

Publication date

30th November 1999


Richard Littlejohn

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