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The Highwayman's Daughter by Henriette Gyland

Sarah Broadhurst's view...

A lovely, light, frothy, eighteenth century adventure that sees baby Cora adopted by dashing highwayman Ned and eventually taking over his role when illness forces her to find money for medicine and treatment. So off she goes a-robbing and a-loving for she holds up a coach with gorgeous Jack Blythe aboard and life gets complicated. There is inheritance to protect, parentage to unearth and the girl to unmask. It is huge fun.

Choc Lit, the publisher of this novel, was the 2012 Publisher of the Year as voted for by the Festival of Romance.

If you like Henriette Gyland you might also like to read books by Christina Courtenay, Susanna Kearsley and Liz Harris.

Who is Sarah Broadhurst


The Highwayman's Daughter by Henriette Gyland

Is it a crime to steal a heart? Hounslow, 1768. Jack Blythe, heir to the Earl of Lampton, is a man with great expectations. So when his carriage is held up by a masked woman, brandishing a pistol and dressed as a 'gentleman' of the road, he wholly expects to have his purse stolen. And when he senses something strangely familiar about the lovely little bandit, Jack also expects to win his cousin Rupert's wager by tracking her down first. But as Jack and the highwaywoman enter into a swashbuckling game of cat and mouse, uncovering an intricate web of fiercely guarded family secrets, the last thing Jack expects to have stolen is his heart.


There s nothing like a highwayman robbing a carriage to kick off a story and that s how this one begins. In this book highwayman s a young woman, and yes, I know it s been done many times before, but it never gets old. Well, at least not for me. The scene was slightly humorous and you find yourself cheering on the highwayman as soon as she draws her weapon. Cora is a character I liked from the beginning, even when she was breaking the law. She s got a valid reason and it s not just to line her own purse with other people s money and belongings. Jack is also a likeable character and from the beginning he knows he wasn t robbed by a man which keeps you reading to find out if and when he s going to run into Cora and if he ll recognize her. I liked the dialogue in this story which I thought was fitting for this time period and the historical detail was well presented. I also like that there s sort of a story in a story. Jack thinks Cora might be somehow related and that s when the sub-plots kicks into high gear and keeps you reading on. The secondary characters were also well rounded and seemed to have their own story too. Despite its 250 plus pages, it s a fairly quick read. If you like historicals, and like me especially look for ones set in England during the 1700s, I think you ll find this an enjoyable read.

About the Author

Henriette Gyland

Henriette Gyland grew up in Northern Denmark but moved to England after she graduated from the University of Copenhagen. She wrote her first book when she was ten, a tale of two orphan sisters running away to Egypt, fortunately to be adopted by a perfect family they meet on the Orient Express.

Between that first literary exploit and now, she has worked in the Danish civil service, for a travel agent, a consultancy company, in banking, hospital administration, and for a county court before setting herself up as a freelance translator and linguist. Henriette recently began to pursue her writing in earnest winning the New Talent Award in 2011 from the Festival of Romance and a Commended from the Yeovil Literary Prize.

Henriette is married to the grandson of the illustrator Edward Ardizzone, and lives with her family in London.

Below is a Q&A with the author.

How would you describe your novel?
It's a hybrid between crime and romance, sometimes known as romantic suspense or psychological thriller. There's an element of why-dunnit as well as who-dunnit, in addition to love and loss. The heroine Helen suffers from epilepsy so the story also deals with feeling isolated and ostracised, but the main theme is one of memory. This is reflected in the reference to elephants, both in the title and the book itself – the myth about elephants is that they remember everything, which provides a contrast to Helen's own fragmented memories.

What gave you the inspiration for the story?
The story is partly inspired by a real-life crime. In the book Helen is present when her mother is murdered, but she's a young child at the time and suffers an epileptic seizure while this is taking place. This gave me a chance to explore the theme of the unreliable witness. How much did she actually see, and can her interpretation be trusted? Can she even trust herself?

Where and how do you write?
I concentrate best away from the computer and distractions such as email, and write in long-hand. Technically that means I can write anywhere, although I do have a few favourite places, often the sofa when everyone else is out of the house. In spring, summer, and early autumn I sit in the garden, usually wrapped in a fleece or a long cardigan. This summer I've been wearing my cardigan a lot! Then there are local cafés and the library where, strangely, the hustle and bustle enables me to switch off from the world.

Who do you base your characters on?
I never base my characters on real people, although the hero in my first novel bears a striking resemblance to our window cleaner! I tend to “hear” my characters in my head, their voices and thoughts etc., and then piece together a mental picture of them. However, the hero Jason in this book popped into my head complete with a Musketeers-style goatee. Helen I pictured in her Goan setting at the start of the main story, and by coincidence – or perhaps a subliminal message? – she ended up looking a little like Franka Potente in The Bourne Supremacy. I think it was the setting which did it.

What three things would you take if you were to be stranded on a desert island?
I couldn't do without pen and paper (I'm taking the liberty of including two items into one category here). I would also bring my well-thumbed copy of Lord of the Rings by JRR Tolkien. I read this book every 2-3 years or so and always discover something new in it. Perhaps my copy magically rewrites itself between reads...? Also, I'd take lots of Earl Grey tea which would provide a link to civilisation. As long as there's tea, I can live on fish stewed in mango juice, no problem.

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Book Info

Publication date

1st May 2014


Henriette Gyland

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Choc Lit


275 pages


Romantic Fiction

Historical romance



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