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Professor R. W. Sharples - Author

About the Author

Books by Professor R. W. Sharples

Whose Aristotle? Whose Aristotelianism? Whose Aristotle? Whose Aristotelianism?

Whose Aristotle? Whose Aristotelianism? Whose Aristotle? Whose Aristotelianism?

Author: Professor R. W. Sharples Format: Hardback Release Date: 12/11/2018

This title was first published in 2001. A collection of the papers and some of the formal responses from a colloquium on the ancient philosopher Aristotle, with one additional paper. The contributors explore Aristotle and how he is perceived and interpreted in different traditions, and by different people.

Perspectives on Greek Philosophy S.V. Keeling Memorial Lectures in Ancient Philosophy 1992-2002

Perspectives on Greek Philosophy S.V. Keeling Memorial Lectures in Ancient Philosophy 1992-2002

Author: Professor R. W. Sharples Format: Hardback Release Date: 22/11/2017

Title first published in 2003. In commemoration of the philosophical interests of Stanley Victor Keeling, the annual lectures in his memory highlight the interest and importance of ancient philosophy for contemporary study of the subject. This volume brings together the Keeling lectures from leading international figures in ancient and modern philosophy, presented between 1992 and 2002. Including contributions from Bernard Williams and Martha Nussbaum, lectures range across topics such as 'Intrinsic Goodness', Necessity, Fate and Determinism and Quality of Life, extending from Plato through Aristotle to the Stoics. Edited and with a preface by R. W. Sharples.

Alexander of Aphrodisias: Ethical Problems

Alexander of Aphrodisias: Ethical Problems

Author: Professor R. W. Sharples Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 18/01/2013

Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics has been a central text in moral philosophy since the fourth century BC. The Ethical Problems attributed to Alexander of Aphrodisias - the leading ancient commentator on Aristotle - not only shows us how Aristotle's work was discussed in Alexander's own day (c. 200 AD) but offers interpretations and insights that are valuable in their own right. Topics discussed include pleasure and distress, moral virtue, the criteria for judging actions voluntary, the development of moral understanding, and the place in ethics of utility, political community and a sense of shame.

Alexander of Aphrodisias: Quaestiones 1.1-2.15

Alexander of Aphrodisias: Quaestiones 1.1-2.15

Author: Professor R. W. Sharples Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 18/01/2013

The Quaestiones attributed to Alexander of Aphrodisias, the leading ancient commentator on Aristotle, are concerned with physics and metaphysics, psychology and divine providence. They exemplify the process by which Aristotle's thought came to be organised into 'Aristotelianism', and show how interpretations were influenced by the doctrines of Hellenistic philosophy. Some of them, translated into Arabic and thence into Latin, played a part in the transmission of ancient Greek philosophy to the medieval world; and they are still of use today in the interpretation of Aristotle's views on such matters as the problem of universals and the relation between form and matter. The Quaestiones have been studied more and more in recent years; but the present volume and its successor offer the first translation of the whole collection into English or any other modern language.

Alexander of Aphrodisias: Quaestiones 2.16-3.15

Alexander of Aphrodisias: Quaestiones 2.16-3.15

Author: Professor R. W. Sharples Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 01/01/2013

This volume completes the translation in this series of Quaestiones attributed to Alexander of Aphrodisias, the leading ancient commentator on Aristotle. The Quaestiones are concerned with physics and metaphysics, psychology and divine providence. They exemplify the process whereby Aristotle's thought came to be organised into 'Aristotelianism' and show how interpretations were influenced by doctrines of Hellenistic philosophy. Some, translated into Arabic and thence into Latin, played a part in the transmission of ancient Greek philosophy to the medieval world. Those interested in Aristotle's psychological views will find this half of Quaestiones particularly valuable. Ten of the problems discussed explicitly involve issues raised in On the Soul, including the unity of apperception and the transition from first to second actuality in the act of contemplation. A further dozen concern problems in physical theory, including infinity, necessity and potentiality. Quaestio 2.21 concerns divine providence and helps supplement our knowledge of Alexander's position based on surviving Arabic fragments of his On Providence.

Peripatetic Philosophy, 200 BC to AD 200 An Introduction and Collection of Sources in Translation

Peripatetic Philosophy, 200 BC to AD 200 An Introduction and Collection of Sources in Translation

Author: Professor R. W. Sharples Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 14/10/2010

This book provides a collection of sources, many of them fragmentary and previously scattered and hard to access, for the development of Peripatetic philosophy in the later Hellenistic period and the early Roman Empire. It also supplies the background against which the first commentator on Aristotle from whom extensive material survives, Alexander of Aphrodisias (fl. c. AD 200), developed his interpretations which continue to be influential even today. Many of the passages are here translated into English for the first time, including the whole of the summary of Peripatetic ethics attributed to 'Arius Didymus'.

Peripatetic Philosophy, 200 BC to AD 200 An Introduction and Collection of Sources in Translation

Peripatetic Philosophy, 200 BC to AD 200 An Introduction and Collection of Sources in Translation

Author: Professor R. W. Sharples Format: Hardback Release Date: 14/10/2010

This book provides a collection of sources, many of them fragmentary and previously scattered and hard to access, for the development of Peripatetic philosophy in the later Hellenistic period and the early Roman Empire. It also supplies the background against which the first commentator on Aristotle from whom extensive material survives, Alexander of Aphrodisias (fl. c. AD 200), developed his interpretations which continue to be influential even today. Many of the passages are here translated into English for the first time, including the whole of the summary of Peripatetic ethics attributed to 'Arius Didymus'.

Stoics, Epicureans and Sceptics An Introduction to Hellenistic Philosophy

Stoics, Epicureans and Sceptics An Introduction to Hellenistic Philosophy

Author: Professor R. W. Sharples Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 12/09/1996

First published in 1996. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Stoics, Epicureans and Sceptics An Introduction to Hellenistic Philosophy

Stoics, Epicureans and Sceptics An Introduction to Hellenistic Philosophy

Author: Professor R. W. Sharples Format: Hardback Release Date: 12/09/1996

First published in 1996. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Plato: Meno

Plato: Meno

Author: Professor R. W. Sharples Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 01/01/1985

Plato's Meno is the dialogue which more than any other occupies a transitional position between the early Socratic dialogues and the developed middle period theory of the Phaedo, Symposium and Republic. It is thus of particular interest for the insights that it gives us into the process by which Plato arrived at that theory. The issues which it raises are philosophically interesting in themselves: how can we know that we have the right answer to a question, unless we knew what the answer was before we asked the question in the first place? Is excellence (arete!) something that we can acquire by being taught, or is it something that we are born with? And the dialogue is of historical interest for the evidence it provides, both for ancient Greek notions of what constitutes excellence, and for contemporary attitudes to the Sophists, who claimed to teach excellence and took larger fees for doing so. Greek text with facing-page translation and notes and commentary.