LoveReading

Becoming a member of the LoveReading community is free.

No catches, no fine print just unadulterated book loving, with your favourite books saved to your own digital bookshelf.

New members get entered into our monthly draw to win £100 to spend in your local bookshop Plus lots lots more…

Find out more

Matthew Holden - Author

About the Author

Books by Matthew Holden

The Changing Racial Regime

The Changing Racial Regime

Author: Matthew Holden Format: Hardback Release Date: 29/01/2018

The National Political Science Review is the official publication of the National Conference of Black Political Scientists. The Review's purpose, as described by Matthew Holden in his introduction, is to lead to new information, insights, and findings into the social and political status of African Americans. The volume is not exclusionist or narrow. It integrates essays that could stand alone, as they initially were written, according to the method and theory of the author in question. As presented here, however, they also lend themselves to a broader treatment of race and the political order. The present volume combines essays expressly focused on African Americans, Africa, and the African diaspora. At the same tune, it contains essays about broad generic subjects such as budgeting and interest groups, written with no explicit racial relevance. Holden integrates these essays under the theme of the changing racial regime. The integrating concept is the old word regime, which political scientists have used in many situations before to define such more or less persistent, though not necessarily permanent, orders of precedence. If no significant benefits and no significant burdens could be forecast by knowledge of the social identity called race, then the regime could be seen as non-racial. In American experience, the regime was, at one time, purposeful and sustained white advantage. The white race and its preferential standing, was central to virtually all institutional practice public and private. The significant contemporary question is the degree of change hi the racial regime. Some proceed with the assumption that a large degree of change has occurred in the American political system. The view of other contributors is that the system still sustains racial stratification. In its very internal dialogue, this volume presents a panorama of current work by political scientists, African American and other, on the character of the American political system. Contributors include: Cedric Robinson, Charles Henry, Edward J. Muller, Marjorie Lewis, Katherine A. Hinckley and Bette S. Hill, Nancy Haggard-Gilson, and Vernon Johnson. The Changing Racial Regime is an essential resource for political scientists, black studies specialists, and scholars and policy analysts of race relations in the United States.

The City is Our Farm

The City is Our Farm

Author: Matthew Holden Format: Hardback Release Date: 13/07/2017

The City Is Our Farm examines cultural change in Africa from the vantage point of real human beings caught up in that change. By presenting vignettes from the daily lives of seven households, Professor Aronson presents what is the source of social-science theory: the experience of individuals. To readers who think of development in terms of GNP, political rhetoric, and vague abstractions, this book supplies a much-needed corrective.

The Changing Racial Regime

The Changing Racial Regime

Author: Matthew Holden Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 30/01/1995

The National Political Science Review is the official publication of the National Conference of Black Political Scientists. The Review's purpose, as described by Matthew Holden in his introduction, is to lead to new information, insights, and findings into the social and political status of African Americans. The volume is not exclusionist or narrow. It integrates essays that could stand alone, as they initially were written, according to the method and theory of the author in question. As presented here, however, they also lend themselves to a broader treatment of race and the political order. The present volume combines essays expressly focused on African Americans, Africa, and the African diaspora. At the same tune, it contains essays about broad generic subjects such as budgeting and interest groups, written with no explicit racial relevance. Holden integrates these essays under the theme of the changing racial regime. The integrating concept is the old word regime, which political scientists have used in many situations before to define such more or less persistent, though not necessarily permanent, orders of precedence. If no significant benefits and no significant burdens could be forecast by knowledge of the social identity called race, then the regime could be seen as non-racial. In American experience, the regime was, at one time, purposeful and sustained white advantage. The white race and its preferential standing, was central to virtually all institutional practice-public and private. The significant contemporary question is the degree of change hi the racial regime. Some proceed with the assumption that a large degree of change has occurred in the American political system. The view of other contributors is that the system still sustains racial stratification. In its very internal dialogue, this volume presents a panorama of current work by political scientists, African American and other, on the character of the American political system. Contributors include: Cedric Robinson, Charles Henry, Edward J. Muller, Marjorie Lewis, Katherine A. Hinckley and Bette S. Hill, Nancy Haggard-Gilson, and Vernon Johnson. The Changing Racial Regime is an essential resource for political scientists, black studies specialists, and scholars and policy analysts of race relations in the United States.

The Challenge to Racial Stratification

The Challenge to Racial Stratification

Author: Matthew Holden Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 31/12/1994

The National Political Science Review is the official publication of the National Conference of Black Political Scientists. This series, now entering its fourth volume, includes significant scholarly research reflecting the diverse interests of scholars from various backgrounds who use different models, approaches, and methodologies. The central focus is on politics and policies that advantage or disadvantage groups because of race, ethnicity, gender, and other major variables. In his Introduction to this volume, Matthew Holden describes the rationale for the creation of American racial stratification, and boldly shows how American intellectuals have helped reinforce that stratification. Several chapters discuss conflicts in contemporary views of the United States, ranging from a belief in its being a free society to the historical reality of the nation's background as a slave society. Other chapters address the international problem of racial stratification, concentrating on Nigeria and South Africa. Among the major contributions are Constitutional Legacy of Slavery by Donald Robinson; Religous Resources and African-American Political Action by Ronald E. Brown and Monica Wolford; Civil Rights and the Supreme Court: A Return of the Past by Stephen L. Wasby; White Flight in the Voting Booth: The Racial Composition of Localities and Partisan Voting hi the 1980s by Mark William Hertzog; Approaching the Twenty-First Century: A World Society Model of Global Politics by Franke Wilmer. Also included is an in-depth review-essay section on such subjects as African-American women hi politics, the political implications of Jesse Jackson's 1984 presidential campaign, racial and ethnic politics in California, and black Americans' views of racial inequality.

The City is Our Farm

The City is Our Farm

Author: Matthew Holden Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 15/01/1977

The City Is Our Farm examines cultural change in Africa from the vantage point of real human beings caught up in that change. By presenting vignettes from the daily lives of seven households, Professor Aronson presents what is the source of social-science theory: the experience of individuals. To readers who think of development in terms of GNP, political rhetoric, and vague abstractions, this book supplies a much-needed corrective.