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Lucie Armitt - Author

About the Author

Books by Lucie Armitt

History of the Gothic: Twentieth-Century Gothic

History of the Gothic: Twentieth-Century Gothic

Author: Lucie Armitt Format: Hardback Release Date: 01/09/2009

This book covers Gothic writing and film from Henry James to Sarah Waters. Among its primary themes are the role of the ghost in relation to childhood and cultural mourning, the relationship between Gothic Architecture and the 'landscapes' of dream and nightmare and the interface between Gothic and Horror modes of writing.

History of the Gothic: Twentieth-Century Gothic

History of the Gothic: Twentieth-Century Gothic

Author: Lucie Armitt Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 01/09/2009

Why, at a time when the majority of us no longer believe in ghosts, demons or the occult, does Gothic continue to have such a strong grasp upon literature, cinema and popular culture? This book answers the question by exploring some of the ways in which we have applied Gothic tropes to our everyday fears. The book opens with The Turn of the Screw, a text dealing in the dangers adults pose to children whilst simultaneously questioning the assumed innocence of all children. Staying with the domestic arena, it explores the various manifestations undertaken by the haunted house during the twentieth century, from the bombed-out spaces of the blitz ('The Demon Lover' and The Night Watch) to the designer bathrooms of wealthy American suburbia (What Lies Beneath). The monsters that emerge through the uncanny surfaces of the Gothic can also be terror monsters, and after a discussion of terrorism and atrocity in relation to burial alive, the book examines the relationship between the human and the inhuman through the role of the beast monster as manifestation of the evil that resides in our midst (The Hound of the Baskervilles and The Birds). It is with the dangers of the body that the Gothic has been most closely associated and, during the later twentieth century, paranoia attaches itself to skeletal forms and ghosts in the wake of the HIV/AIDS crisis. Sexuality and/as disease is one of the themes of Patrick McGrath's work (Dr Haggard's Disease and 'The Angel') and the issue of skeletons in the closet is also explored through Henry James's 'The Jolly Corner'. However, sexuality is also one of the most liberating aspects of Gothic narratives. After a brief discussion of camp humour in British television drama series Jekyll, the book concludes with a discussion of the apparitional lesbian through the work of Sarah Waters.

Fantasy Fiction An Introduction

Fantasy Fiction An Introduction

Author: Lucie Armitt Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 01/03/2005

A series of introductory books, the Genre Series offers students, writers and academics a window into some of the most popular topics, styles and periods in literature. Designed to be user-friendly, each volume shares the same structure, including: A broad definition of the genre and its essential elements; A timeline of historical developments; Critical concerns to bear in mind while reading; Detailed readings of several key texts; In-depth analysis of major themes and issues; Signposts for further study; A summary of the most important criticism in the field; A glossary of terms; An annotated, critical reading list.

Fantasy Fiction

Fantasy Fiction

Author: Lucie Armitt Format: Hardback Release Date: 01/03/2005

A series of introductory books, the Genre Series offers students, writers and academics a window into some of the most popular topics, styles and periods in literature. Designed to be user-friendly, each volume shares the same structure, including: A broad definition of the genre and its essential elements; A timeline of historical developments; Critical concerns to bear in mind while reading; Detailed readings of several key texts; In-depth analysis of major themes and issues; Signposts for further study; A summary of the most important criticism in the field; A glossary of terms; An annotated, critical reading list.

George Eliot: Adam Bede, The Mill on the Floss, Middlemarch Essays, Articles, Reviews

George Eliot: Adam Bede, The Mill on the Floss, Middlemarch Essays, Articles, Reviews

Author: Lucie Armitt Format: Hardback Release Date: 08/08/2001

George Eliot's reception as a writer has been checkered from the start. Prejudice followed the revelation of her real identity as a woman, and she suffered from critical neglect at the start of the twentieth century before a postwar renaissance of interest established her as one of the most powerful of British novelists.Focusing on three of Eliot's most influential and widely read Midlands novels, this guide traces recent critical interpretations of her work as well as revisiting some of the perspectives offered by original reviewers and early critics. Class, gender, and ideology all come under scrutiny, as do Eliot's central fictive themes of currency, circulation, sensuality, and the voice.

Contemporary Women's Fiction and the Fantastic

Contemporary Women's Fiction and the Fantastic

Author: Lucie Armitt Format: Hardback Release Date: 14/07/2000

This volume examines a wide variety of the ways in which the fantastic has impacted upon contemporary women's fiction. Some of the issues addressed include: the importance of the cyborg and the spectre to critical and fictional discourses of gender; the interface between the grotesque and contemporary readings of feminist utopianism; the growing similarity between late twentieth-century gothicism and the magical real. The study is based upon the work of fifteen writers and includes novels by Allende, Atwood, Carter, Head, Morrison, Weldon, Winterson and Wittig.

Contemporary Women's Fiction and the Fantastic

Contemporary Women's Fiction and the Fantastic

Author: Lucie Armitt Format: Hardback Release Date: 14/04/2000

This volume examines a wide variety of the ways in which the fantastic has impacted upon contemporary women's fiction. Some of the issues addressed include: the importance of the cyborg and the spectre to critical and fictional discourses of gender; the interface between the grotesque and contemporary readings of feminist utopianism; the growing similarity between late twentieth-century gothicism and the magical real. The study is based upon the work of fifteen writers and includes novels by Allende, Atwood, Carter, Head, Morrison, Weldon, Winterson and Wittig.

Contemporary Women's Fiction and the Fantastic

Contemporary Women's Fiction and the Fantastic

Author: Lucie Armitt Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 06/04/2000

This volume examines a wide variety of the ways in which the fantastic has impacted upon contemporary women's fiction. Some of the issues addressed include: the importance of the cyborg and the spectre to critical and fictional discourses of gender; the interface between the grotesque and contemporary readings of feminist utopianism; the growing similarity between late twentieth-century gothicism and the magical real. The study is based upon the work of fifteen writers and includes novels by Allende, Atwood, Carter, Head, Morrison, Weldon, Winterson and Wittig.

George Eliot - Adam Bede/The Mill on the Floss/Middlemarch

George Eliot - Adam Bede/The Mill on the Floss/Middlemarch

Author: Lucie Armitt Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 01/04/2000

George Eliot's reception as a writer has been chequered from the start. Prejudice followed the reluctant revelation of her real identity as a woman, and she suffered from critical neglect at the start of the twentieth century, before a post-war renaissance of interest finally established her as one of the most powerful and accomplished of British novelists. Views of Mary Ann Evans, the woman behind the pseudonym, have always been controversial: castigated during her own time for sexual impropriety with a married man, accused by male 'friends' of being an overly intellectual 'man-woman', rejected by twentieth-century feminists for the opinions expressed in her essay 'Silly Novels by Lady Novelists', she is a figure for our own times as much as for her own. Focusing on three of Eliot's most influential and widely-read 'Midlands' novels, Lucie Armitt traces the effect of recent critical interpretations upon the reception and teaching of Eliot's work, as well as revisiting some of the perspectives offered by original reviewers and early critics. Class, gender and ideology all come under scrutiny, as do Eliot's central fictive themes of currency, circulation, sensuality and the voice. A variety of theoretical positions are reflected in the material selected for discussion, including post-structuralism, feminism, Marxism and psychoanalysis. Clear explication of these discourses is offered, combined with informative and detailed readings of primary extracts as illustrations.