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Kenneth Morris Hamilton - Author

About the Author

Books by Kenneth Morris Hamilton

The Doctrine of Humanity in the Theology of Reinhold Niebuhr

The Doctrine of Humanity in the Theology of Reinhold Niebuhr

Author: Kenneth Morris Hamilton Format: Hardback Release Date: 26/09/2020

Reinhold Niebuhr was a twentieth-century American theologian who was known for his commentary on public affairs. One of his most influential ideas was the relating of his Christian faith to realism rather than idealism in foreign affairs. His perspective influenced many liberals and is enjoying a resurgence today; most recently Barack Obama has acknowledged Niebuhr's importance to his own thinking. In this book, Kenneth Hamilton makes a claim that no other work on Niebuhr has madeathat Niebuhr's chief and abiding preoccupation throughout his long career was the nature of humankind. Hamilton engages in a close reading of Niebuhr's entire oeuvre through this lens. He argues that this preoccupation remained consistent throughout Niebuhr's writings, and that through his doctrine of humankind one gets a full sense of Niebuhr the theologian. Hamilton exposes not only the internal consistency of Niebuhr's project but also its aporia. Although Niebuhr's influence perhaps peaked in the mid-twentieth century, enthusiasm for his approach to religion and politics has never waned from the North American public theology, and this work remains relevant today. Although Hamilton wrote this thesis in the mid-1960s it is published here for the first time. Jane Barter Moulaison, in her editorial gloss and introduction, demonstrates the abiding significance of Hamilton's work to the study of Niebuhr by bringing it into conversation with subsequent writings on Niebuhr, particularly as he is re-appropriated by twenty-first-century American theology.

Booker T. Washington in American Memory

Booker T. Washington in American Memory

Author: Kenneth Morris Hamilton Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 01/02/2017

Since the 1960s, many historians have condemned Booker T. Washington as a problematic, even negative, influence on African American progress. This attitude dramatically contrasts with the nationwide outpouring of grief and reverence that followed Washington's death in 1915. Kenneth M. Hamilton describes how, when, where, and why Americans commemorated the life of Booker T. Washington. For months following his death, tens of thousands of Americans, especially blacks, honored his memory. Their memorials revealed that Washington enjoyed widespread national support for his vision of America and the programs that he imparted to achieve his aspirations. Their actions and articulations provide rich insight into how a cross section of Washington's contemporaries viewed him. From private messages of solace to public pronouncements, countless Americans portrayed him as a revered national icon. Among other characteristics, commemorates voiced their appreciation of his humanitarianism, humility, nationalism, perseverance, philanthropy, progressivism, spirituality, and wisdom. Washington was the leading advocate of the Yankee Protestantism Ethic, which promoted education, and personal qualities such as pragmatism, perseverance, cleanliness, thrift, and the dignity of labor among African Americans.

Doctrine of Humanity in the Theology of Reinhold Niebuhr

Doctrine of Humanity in the Theology of Reinhold Niebuhr

Author: Kenneth Morris Hamilton Format: eBook Release Date: 03/09/2013

Reinhold Niebuhr was a twentieth-century American theologian who was known for his commentary on public affairs. One of his most influential ideas was the relating of his Christian faith to realism rather than idealism in foreign affairs. His perspective influenced many liberals and is enjoying a resurgence today; most recently Barack Obama has acknowledged Niebuhrs importance to his own thinking. In this book, Kenneth Hamilton makes a claim that no other work on Niebuhr has madethat Niebuhrs chief and abiding preoccupation throughout his long career was the nature of humankind. Hamilton engages in a close reading of Niebuhrs entire oeuvre through this lens. He argues that this preoccupation remained consistent throughout Niebuhrs writings, and that through his doctrine of humankind one gets a full sense of Niebuhr the theologian. Hamilton exposes not only the internal consistency of Niebuhrs project but also its aporia. Although Niebuhrs influence perhaps peaked in the mid-twentieth century, enthusiasm for his approach to religion and politics has never waned from the North American public theology, and this work remains relevant today. Although Hamilton wrote this thesis in the mid-1960s it is published here for the first time. Jane Barter Moulaison, in her editorial gloss and introduction, demonstrates the abiding significance of Hamiltons work to the study of Niebuhr by bringing it into conversation with subsequent writings on Niebuhr, particularly as he is re-appropriated by twenty-first-century American theology.

Doctrine of Humanity in the Theology of Reinhold Niebuhr

Doctrine of Humanity in the Theology of Reinhold Niebuhr

Author: Kenneth Morris Hamilton Format: eBook Release Date: 03/09/2013

Reinhold Niebuhr was a twentieth-century American theologian who was known for his commentary on public affairs. One of his most influential ideas was the relating of his Christian faith to realism rather than idealism in foreign affairs. His perspective influenced many liberals and is enjoying a resurgence today; most recently Barack Obama has acknowledged Niebuhr's importance to his own thinking. In this book, Kenneth Hamilton makes a claim that no other work on Niebuhr has made'that Niebuhr's chief and abiding preoccupation throughout his long career was the nature of humankind. Hamilton engages in a close reading of Niebuhr's entire oeuvre through this lens. He argues that this preoccupation remained consistent throughout Niebuhr's writings, and that through his doctrine of humankind one gets a full sense of Niebuhr the theologian. Hamilton exposes not only the internal consistency of Niebuhr's project but also its aporia. Although Niebuhr's influence perhaps peaked in the mid-twentieth century, enthusiasm for his approach to religion and politics has never waned from the North American public theology, and this work remains relevant today. Although Hamilton wrote this thesis in the mid-1960s it is published here for the first time. Jane Barter Moulaison, in her editorial gloss and introduction, demonstrates the abiding significance of Hamilton's work to the study of Niebuhr by bringing it into conversation with subsequent writings on Niebuhr, particularly as he is re-appropriated by twenty-first-century American theology.