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John L. Steckley - Author

About the Author

Books by John L. Steckley

Words of the Huron

Words of the Huron

Author: John L. Steckley Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 02/08/2019

Words of the Huron is an investigation into seventeenth-century Huron culture through a kind of linguistic archaeology of a language that died midway through the twentieth century. John L. Steckley explores a range of topics, including: the construction of longhouses and wooden armour; the use of words for trees in village names; the social anthropological standards of kinship terms and clans; Huron conceptualizing of European-borne disease; the spirit realm of orenda ; Huron nations and kinship groups; relationship to the environment; material culture; and the relationship between the French missionaries and settlers and the Huron people. Steckley's source material includes the first dictionary of any Aboriginal language, Recollect Brother Gabriel Sagard's Huron phrasebook, published in 1632, and the sophisticated Jesuit missionary study of the language from the 1620s to the 1740s, beginning with the work of Father Jean de BrA (c)beuf. The only book of its kind, Words of the Huron will spark discussion among scholars, students, and anyone interested in North American archaeology, Native studies, cultural anthropology, and seventeenth-century North American history.

Indian Agents Rulers of the Reserves

Indian Agents Rulers of the Reserves

Author: John L. Steckley Format: Hardback Release Date: 23/08/2016

Canadians are beginning to learn about the negative effects of residential schools on Aboriginal people in Canada. More hidden in the written record, but bearing a similar powerfully destructive role, are Indian Agents, who were with very few exceptions White men who `ruled the reserves' in Canada from the 1870s to the 1960s. This book is the first to present a discussion of Indian Agents in general. It provides an introductory look at the control Indian Agents exercised over Aboriginal communities throughout the period in question. The primary intent is to spark discussion in Indigenous studies courses. This book is built upon a discussion of the lives and impact of five Indian Agents: Hayter Reed, William Morris Graham, John McIver, William Halliday, and Fred Hall. However, the practices and views of 39 other Indian Agents are interwoven throughout the text. Although there was a readily detectable sameness in the way that Indian Agent power was imposed on Aboriginal communities based on the institutional racism of the Indian Agent System, one of the points to be made is that not all Indian Agents were the same. Some were more oppressive than others. Also frequently pointed out is the fact that Aboriginal peoples were not merely helpless victims to Indian Agent control, but resisted that control, sometimes successfully. The book concludes with a chapter comparing the Indian Agent System in Canada, with similar systems in the United States, Australia, and New Zealand.

The Eighteenth-Century Wyandot A Clan-Based Study

The Eighteenth-Century Wyandot A Clan-Based Study

Author: John L. Steckley Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 01/11/2015

The Wyandot were born of two Wendat peoples encountered by the French in the first half of the seventeenth centuryathe otherwise named Petun and Huronaand their history is fragmented by their dispersal between Quebec, Michigan, Kansas, and Oklahoma. This book weaves these fragmented histories together, with a focus on the mid-eighteenth century. Author John Steckley claims that the key to consolidating the stories of the scattered Wyandot lies in their clan structure. Beginning with the half century of their initial diaspora, as interpreted through the political strategies of five clan leaders, and continuing through the eighteenth century and their shared residency with Jesuit missionariesanotably, the distinct relationships different clans established with themaSteckley reveals the resilience of the Wyandot clan structure. He draws upon rich but previously ignored sourcesaincluding baptismal, marriage, and mortuary records, and a detailed house-to-house census compiled in 1747, featuring a list of male and female eldersato illustrate the social structure of the people, including a study of both male and female leadership patterns. A recording of the 1747 census as well as translated copies of letters sent between the Wyandot and the French is included in an appendix.

Eighteenth-Century Wyandot

Eighteenth-Century Wyandot

Author: John L. Steckley Format: eBook Release Date: 17/04/2014

The Wyandot were born of two Wendat peoples encountered by the French in the first half of the seventeenth centurythe otherwise named Petun and Huronand their history is fragmented by their dispersal between Quebec, Michigan, Kansas, and Oklahoma. This book weaves these fragmented histories together, with a focus on the mid-eighteenth century. Author John Steckley claims that the key to consolidating the stories of the scattered Wyandot lies in their clan structure. Beginning with the half century of their initial diaspora, as interpreted through the political strategies of five clan leaders, and continuing through the eighteenth century and their shared residency with Jesuit missionariesnotably, the distinct relationships different clans established with themSteckley reveals the resilience of the Wyandot clan structure. He draws upon rich but previously ignored sourcesincluding baptismal, marriage, and mortuary records, and a detailed house-to-house census compiled in 1747, featuring a list of male and female eldersto illustrate the social structure of the people, including a study of both male and female leadership patterns. A recording of the 1747 census as well as translated copies of letters sent between the Wyandot and the French is included in an appendix.

Eighteenth-Century Wyandot

Eighteenth-Century Wyandot

Author: John L. Steckley Format: eBook Release Date: 25/03/2014

The Wyandot were born of two Wendat peoples encountered by the French in the first half of the seventeenth century'the otherwise named Petun and Huron'and their history is fragmented by their dispersal between Quebec, Michigan, Kansas, and Oklahoma. This book weaves these fragmented histories together, with a focus on the mid-eighteenth century. Author John Steckley claims that the key to consolidating the stories of the scattered Wyandot lies in their clan structure. Beginning with the half century of their initial diaspora, as interpreted through the political strategies of five clan leaders, and continuing through the eighteenth century and their shared residency with Jesuit missionaries'notably, the distinct relationships different clans established with them'Steckley reveals the resilience of the Wyandot clan structure. He draws upon rich but previously ignored sources'including baptismal, marriage, and mortuary records, and a detailed house-to-house census compiled in 1747, featuring a list of male and female elders'to illustrate the social structure of the people, including a study of both male and female leadership patterns. A recording of the 1747 census as well as translated copies of letters sent between the Wyandot and the French is included in an appendix.

The Eighteenth-Century Wyandot A Clan-Based Study

The Eighteenth-Century Wyandot A Clan-Based Study

Author: John L. Steckley Format: Hardback Release Date: 14/02/2014

The Wyandot were born of two Wendat peoples encountered by the French in the first half of the seventeenth century--the otherwise named Petun and Huron--and their history is fragmented by their dispersal between Quebec, Michigan, Kansas, and Oklahoma. This book weaves these fragmented histories together, with a focus on the mid-eighteenth century. Author John Steckley claims that the key to consolidating the stories of the scattered Wyandot lies in their clan structure. Beginning with the half century of their initial diaspora, as interpreted through the political strategies of five clan leaders, and continuing through the eighteenth century and their shared residency with Jesuit missionaries--notably, the distinct relationships different clans established with them--Steckley reveals the resilience of the Wyandot clan structure. He draws upon rich but previously ignored sources--including baptismal, marriage, and mortuary records, and a detailed house-to-house census compiled in 1747, featuring a list of male and female elders--to illustrate the social structure of the people, including a study of both male and female leadership patterns. A recording of the 1747 census as well as translated copies of letters sent between the Wyandot and the French is included in an appendix.

Words of the Huron

Words of the Huron

Author: John L. Steckley Format: eBook Release Date: 25/02/2007

Words of the Huron is an investigation into seventeenth-century Huron culture through a kind of linguistic archaeology of a language that died midway through the twentieth century. John L. Steckley explores a range of topics, including: the construction of longhouses and wooden armour; the use of words for trees in village names; the social anthropological standards of kinship terms and clans; Huron conceptualizing of European-borne disease; the spirit realm of orenda ; Huron nations and kinship groups; relationship to the environment; material culture; and the relationship between the French missionaries and settlers and the Huron people. Steckleys source material includes the first dictionary of any Aboriginal language, Recollect Brother Gabriel Sagards Huron phrasebook, published in 1632, and the sophisticated Jesuit missionary study of the language from the 1620s to the 1740s, beginning with the work of Father Jean de Brebeuf. The only book of its kind, Words of the Huron will spark discussion among scholars, students, and anyone interested in North American archaeology, Native studies, cultural anthropology, and seventeenth-century North American history.