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james wright - Author

About the Author

Books by james wright

The Branch Will Not Break: 20th Century Nature Poems of North America (Hardcover)

The Branch Will Not Break: 20th Century Nature Poems of North America (Hardcover)

Author: James Wright Format: Hardback Release Date: 21/06/2019

The Branch Will Not Break is a reflective anthology of poems which evokes its author's upbringing in poverty-stricken Ohio during the 1930s and 1940s. Representing a radical and innovative departure from the more conventional and nature-orientated works of his earlier career, this collection sees James Wright embark on sudden narrative shifts while conjuring evocative imagery full of implication. Often, the poems begin with a description of a person or object - after these initial verses, we find a blossoming of imagery. This collection was the result of years of collaboration Wright enjoyed with fellow poet Robert Bly. Economical with words, Wright's poems are generally short but unfailing in evocation and implication. Some of the shortest, most rhythmic works in this collection carry shades of Eastern poetry such as Haiku. Others declare a raw scene, image and meaning in an appealing and deceptively simple manner.

The Branch Will Not Break: 20th Century Nature Poems of North America

The Branch Will Not Break: 20th Century Nature Poems of North America

Author: James Wright Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 21/06/2019

The Branch Will Not Break is a reflective anthology of poems which evokes its author's upbringing in poverty-stricken Ohio during the 1930s and 1940s. Representing a radical and innovative departure from the more conventional and nature-orientated works of his earlier career, this collection sees James Wright embark on sudden narrative shifts while conjuring evocative imagery full of implication. Often, the poems begin with a description of a person or object - after these initial verses, we find a blossoming of imagery. This collection was the result of years of collaboration Wright enjoyed with fellow poet Robert Bly. Economical with words, Wright's poems are generally short but unfailing in evocation and implication. Some of the shortest, most rhythmic works in this collection carry shades of Eastern poetry such as Haiku. Others declare a raw scene, image and meaning in an appealing and deceptively simple manner.

The Key to (Almost) Everything Sociology for All of Us

The Key to (Almost) Everything Sociology for All of Us

Author: James Wright Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 29/04/2019

The Key to (Almost) Everything is an engaging, contemporary and concise approach to sociology written for adults, students and just about anybody who could profit from knowing about the discipline of sociology. It is expertly written by an author drawing on 40 years of teaching on the fundamental social structures and processes characteristic of human societies. Each of the book's chapters is modeled on the courses found in the sociology curriculum. These chapters are not course or lecture notes, rather they are engaging lessons on topics such as political sociology, urban sociology, religion in sociology, crime and guns, poverty, the American family, public opinion, wealth and power.

The Key to (Almost) Everything Sociology for All of Us

The Key to (Almost) Everything Sociology for All of Us

Author: James Wright Format: Hardback Release Date: 29/04/2019

The Key to (Almost) Everything is an engaging, contemporary and concise approach to sociology written for adults, students and just about anybody who could profit from knowing about the discipline of sociology. It is expertly written by an author drawing on 40 years of teaching on the fundamental social structures and processes characteristic of human societies. Each of the book's chapters is modeled on the courses found in the sociology curriculum. These chapters are not course or lecture notes, rather they are engaging lessons on topics such as political sociology, urban sociology, religion in sociology, crime and guns, poverty, the American family, public opinion, wealth and power.

Poor and Homeless in the Sunshine State Down and Out in Theme Park Nation

Poor and Homeless in the Sunshine State Down and Out in Theme Park Nation

Author: James Wright Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 26/07/2017

A place like Orlando, Florida is not transformed from swampland to sprawling metropolis through Peter Pan-like flights of fancy, but through theme park expansions requiring developmental schemes that are tough minded and often worsen relationships between the wealthy and the poor. The homeless arrive with their own hopes and illusions, which are soon shattered. The rest of the local population makes its peace with the system. Meanwhile the homeless are reduced to advocacy models that neither middle- nor working-class folks much worry about. They are modern members of Ellison's invisible men but they comprise a racial and social mixture unlike any other in the American landscape. This book is primarily about the dark side of this portrait the poor, near-poor, homeless, and dispossessed who live in the midst of this verdant landscape. The phrase down and out, has been used to describe people who are destitute or penniless since the late nineteenth century. Here the term is used in a more expansive sense, as synonymous with anyone who lives near, at, or over the edge of financial catastrophe.

State of the Masses Sources of Discontent, Change and Stability

State of the Masses Sources of Discontent, Change and Stability

Author: James Wright Format: Hardback Release Date: 14/07/2017

Is the consciousness of Americans in the midst of dramatic transformation? Or do people think and feel much the same as they have always thought and felt? Do most people enjoy their work, or hate it? Is the American family being replaced by new institutional forms, or is it much the same as it was in the 1950's? Have material values been replaced by a postmaterial consciousness in a postindustrial society? Are Americans becoming more conservative, less conservative, or staying about the same? State of the Masses asks the important questions. Originally published in 1986, this prescient study evaluate the views of social critics, neo-conservatives, neo-Marxists, post-industrialists, and the theorists of the little man, who puport to describe the nature, social conditions, outlooks, and motivations of the American populace. The claims of one group are often diametrically opposed to those of another. The authors make the case for which claims can be considered true and which false. Hamilton and Wright analyze the contradictory claims and compares their implications with the best social science research and data available at that time. They also explore the implications for theories in light of the conflicting portrait the evidence provides. The authors conclude with a new perspective for understanding continuities and changes in the United States. This is a prescient view of American society during turmoil, and a model for how social science research can be used predictively.

Enduring Vietnam An American Generation and Its War

Enduring Vietnam An American Generation and Its War

Author: James Wright Format: Hardback Release Date: 12/04/2017

The Vietnam War is largely recalled as a mistake, either in the decision to engage there or in the nature of the engagement. Orboth. Veterans of the war remain largely anonymous figures, accomplices in the mistake. Critically recounting the steps that led to the war, this book does not excuse the mistakes, but it brings those who served out of the shadows. Enduring Vietnam recounts the experiences of the young Americans who fought in Vietnam and of families who grieved those who did not return. By 1969 nearly half of the junior enlisted men who died in Vietnam were draftees. And their median age was 21 - among the non-draftees it was only 20. The book describes the baby boomers growing up in the 1950s, why they went into the military, what they thought of the war, and what it was like to serve in Nam. And to come home. With a vivid narrative of the Battle for Hamburger Hill, and through substantial interviews with those who served, the book depicts the cruelty of this war, and its quiet acts of courage. Enduring Vietnam provides an important dimension to the profile of an American generation and a rich account of an American War.

Those Who Have Borne the Battle A History of America's Wars and Those Who Fought Them

Those Who Have Borne the Battle A History of America's Wars and Those Who Fought Them

Author: James Wright Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 07/05/2013

At the heart of the story of America's wars are our citizen soldiers - those hometown heroes who fought and sacrificed from Bunker Hill at Charlestown to Pointe du Hoc in Normandy, and beyond, without expectation of recognition or recompense. Americans like to think that the service of its citizen volunteers is, and always has been, of momentous importance in our politics and society. But though this has made for good storytelling, the reality of America's relationship to its veterans is far more complex. In Those Who Have Borne the Battle, historian and marine veteran James Wright tells the story of the long, often troubled relationship between America and those who have defended her- from the Revolutionary War to today- shedding new light both on our history and on the issues our country and its armed forces face today. From the beginning, American gratitude to its warriors was not a given. Prior to World War II, the prevailing view was that, as citizen soldiers, the service of its young men was the price of citizenship in a free society. Even Revolutionary War veterans were affectionately, but only temporarily, embraced, as the new nation and its citizens had much else to do. In time, the celebration of the nation's heroes became an important part of our culture, building to the response to World War II, where warriors were celebrated and new government programs provided support for veterans. The greater transformation came in the wars after World War II, as the way we mobilize for war, fight our wars, and honor those who serve has changed in drastic and troubling ways. Unclear and changing military objectives have made our actions harder for civilians to stand behind, a situation compounded by the fact that the armed forces have become less representative of American society as a whole. Few citizens join in the sacrifice that war demands. The support systems seem less and less capable of handling the increasing number of wounded warriors returning from our numerous and bewildering conflicts abroad. A masterful work of history, Those Who Have Borne the Battle expertly relates the burdens carried by veterans dating back to the Revolution, as well as those fighting today's wars. And it challenges Americans to do better for those who serve and sacrifice today.

Real Men DO Eat Quiche

Real Men DO Eat Quiche

Author: James Wright Format: eBook Release Date: 01/05/2013

This is the Hockey Heathen's guide to savory locker room treats. Most everyone has heard of and tasted a quiche at some point in there life. They are usually pretty basic. A pie crust, some eggs, a vegetable, maybe some cheese and a little bacon if your lucky. These are not like that. Imagine some of your favorite foods turned into a quiche. This book contains seven different crusts and twenty six fillings that you can mix and match to your delight. Some examples are pizza crust a potato crust or a bacon crust. Fillings that taste like some of your favorite meals like chicken pot pies, gyros, your favorite hamburger or lasagna. And these are the more conventional fillings. Every one of these has been taste tested and approved by a bunch of tired and hungry hockey hooligans and will satisfy a hungry man, and women too.

Forever New

Forever New

Author: James Wright Format: Hardback Release Date: 13/11/2012

Jim Wright is an unabashed optimist. Reading his speeches, it doesn't take long to see that he believes in the fundamental values that shaped the American republic: opportunity and accessibility, individuality and a shared sense of community. He carried this idealism into his presidency of Dartmouth College and, indeed, throughout his career as teacher and historian. At heart, Jim Wright was always a teacher. His election to the presidency of Dartmouth College gave him the opportunity not only to lead the college he loved, but also to use the presidency as a bully pulpit to encourage his students to make a positive difference in the world. The speeches gathered in this collection, particularly the annual convocation and commencement addresses, illustrate that calling. It is in these addresses that he was the most intentional about his goals and his aspirations for Dartmouth, for the Dartmouth faculty, and ultimately for Dartmouth students.

Those Who Have Borne the Battle

Those Who Have Borne the Battle

Author: James Wright Format: eBook Release Date: 01/05/2012

At the heart of the story of America's wars are our ';citizen soldiers'those hometown heroes who fought and sacrificed from Bunker Hill at Charlestown to Pointe du Hoc in Normandy, and beyond, without expectation of recognition or recompense. Americans like to think that the service of its citizen volunteers is, and always has been, of momentous importance in our politics and society. But though this has made for good storytelling, the reality of America's relationship to its veterans is far more complex. In Those Who Have Borne the Battle, historian and marine veteran James Wright tells the story of the long, often troubled relationship between America and those who have defended herfrom the Revolutionary War to todayshedding new light both on our history and on the issues our country and its armed forces face today.From the beginning, American gratitude to its warriors was not a given. Prior to World War II, the prevailing view was that, as citizen soldiers, the service of its young men was the price of citizenship in a free society. Even Revolutionary War veterans were affectionately, but only temporarily, embraced, as the new nation and its citizens had much else to do.In time, the celebration of the nation's heroes became an important part of our culture, building to the response to World War II, where warriors were celebrated and new government programs provided support for veterans.The greater transformation came in the wars after World War II, as the way we mobilize for war, fight our wars, and honor those who serve has changed in drastic and troubling ways. Unclear and changing military objectives have made our actions harder for civilians to stand behind, a situation compounded by the fact that the armed forces have become less representative of American society as a whole. Few citizens join in the sacrifice that war demands. The support systems seem less and less capable of handling the increasing number of wounded warriors returning from our numerous and bewildering conflicts abroad. A masterful work of history, Those Who Have Borne the Battle expertly relates the burdens carried by veterans dating back to the Revolution, as well as those fighting today's wars. And it challenges Americans to do better for those who serve and sacrifice today.