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Derek R. Peterson - Author

About the Author

Books by Derek R. Peterson

African Print Cultures Newspapers and Their Publics in the Twentieth Century

African Print Cultures Newspapers and Their Publics in the Twentieth Century

Author: Derek R. Peterson Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 09/04/2020

This inaugural volume in the African Perspectives series features the workof new and well-established scholars on the diversity and heterogeneityof African newspapers published from 1880 through the present.Newspapers played a critical role in spreading political awareness amongreaders who were subject to European colonial rule, often engaging inanticolonial and nationalist discourse or popularizing support for Africannationalism and Pan-Africanism. Newspapers also served as incubatorsof literary experimentation and new and varied cultural communities. The contributors highlight the actual practices of newspaper productionat different regional sites and historical junctures, while also developinga set of methodologies and theories of wider relevance to socialhistorians and literary scholars. The first of four thematic sections, African Newspaper Networks, considers the work of newspapereditors and contributors in relating local events and concerns to issuesaffecting others across the continent and beyond. Experiments withGenre explores the literary culture of newspapers that nurtured thedevelopment of new literary genres, such as newspaper poetry, realistfiction, photoplays, and travel writing in African languages and inEnglish. Newspapers and Their Publics looks at the ways in whichAfrican newspapers fostered the creation of new kinds of communitiesand served as networks for public interaction, political and otherwise.The final section, Afterlives, is about the longue duree of history thatnewspapers helped to structure, and how, throughout the twentiethcentury, print allowed contributors to view their writing as material meantfor posterity.

The Invention of Religion Rethinking Belief in Politics and History

The Invention of Religion Rethinking Belief in Politics and History

Author: Derek R. Peterson Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 05/04/2020

What led to the Fourth Amendment's protection of the people against unreasonable searches and seizures, codified in written law for the first time in history, and are we in danger of losing that protection? Celebrated lawyer Samuel Dash, known for his role as Chief Counsel of the Watergate Committee, explores the struggle for privacy. He does so by telling the dramatic tales of the people who were involved in influential legal battles, including landmark Supreme Court cases.Covering almost eight-hundred years of history, Dash begins with the time of King John of England and the Magna Carta, then moves to colonial America as colonists resisted searches mandated under King George. These tensions contributed to the birth of the United States and the adoption of our Bill of Rights with its Fourth Amendment, protecting people against unreasonable searches and seizures. How effective that protection has been is the story of the next two centuries. Dash explores U.S. Supreme Court cases through the sometimes humorous experiences of the people involved, including the unlucky gambler with a shoplifting wife and the police lieutenant turned king of bootleggers. To some extent, judicial safeguarding of Fourth Amendment protections depended on who made up the majority of the Court at any given time. By 2001 a conservative majority of the Court had given law enforcement agents greater search powers than ever before. Dash challenges the legal justification of the Bush Administration's grab for greater search, seizure, and wiretap powers after the 9/11 terrorists' attacks. He reminds us of government abuses of power in prior emergencies in American history. For Dash, the best security is our belief in individual liberty and the enforcement of our Bill of Rights.

The Politics of Heritage in Africa Economies, Histories, and Infrastructures

The Politics of Heritage in Africa Economies, Histories, and Infrastructures

Author: Derek R. Peterson Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 31/08/2017

Heritage work has had a uniquely wide currency in Africa's politics. Secure within the pages of books, encoded in legal statutes, encased in glass display cases and enacted in the panoply of court ritual, the artefacts produced by the heritage domain have become a resource for government administration, a library for traditionalists and a marketable source of value for cultural entrepreneurs. The Politics of Heritage in Africa draws together disparate fields of study - history, archaeology, linguistics, the performing arts and cinema - to show how the lifeways of the past were made into capital, a store of authentic knowledge that political and cultural entrepreneurs could draw from. This book shows African heritage to be a mode of political organisation, a means by which the relics of the past are shored up, reconstructed and revalued as commodities, as tradition, as morality or as patrimony.

African Print Cultures Newspapers and Their Publics in the Twentieth Century

African Print Cultures Newspapers and Their Publics in the Twentieth Century

Author: Derek R. Peterson Format: Hardback Release Date: 30/08/2016

This inaugural volume in the African Perspectives series features the workof new and well-established scholars on the diversity and heterogeneityof African newspapers published from 1880 through the present.Newspapers played a critical role in spreading political awareness amongreaders who were subject to European colonial rule, often engaging inanticolonial and nationalist discourse or popularizing support for Africannationalism and Pan-Africanism. Newspapers also served as incubatorsof literary experimentation and new and varied cultural communities. The contributors highlight the actual practices of newspaper productionat different regional sites and historical junctures, while also developinga set of methodologies and theories of wider relevance to socialhistorians and literary scholars. The first of four thematic sections, African Newspaper Networks, considers the work of newspapereditors and contributors in relating local events and concerns to issuesaffecting others across the continent and beyond. Experiments withGenre explores the literary culture of newspapers that nurtured thedevelopment of new literary genres, such as newspaper poetry, realistfiction, photoplays, and travel writing in African languages and inEnglish. Newspapers and Their Publics looks at the ways in whichAfrican newspapers fostered the creation of new kinds of communitiesand served as networks for public interaction, political and otherwise.The final section, Afterlives, is about the longue duree of history thatnewspapers helped to structure, and how, throughout the twentiethcentury, print allowed contributors to view their writing as material meantfor posterity.

The Politics of Heritage in Africa Economies, Histories, and Infrastructures

The Politics of Heritage in Africa Economies, Histories, and Infrastructures

Author: Derek R. Peterson Format: Hardback Release Date: 02/03/2015

Heritage work has had a uniquely wide currency in Africa's politics. Secure within the pages of books, encoded in legal statutes, encased in glass display cases and enacted in the panoply of court ritual, the artefacts produced by the heritage domain have become a resource for government administration, a library for traditionalists and a marketable source of value for cultural entrepreneurs. The Politics of Heritage in Africa draws together disparate fields of study - history, archaeology, linguistics, the performing arts and cinema - to show how the lifeways of the past were made into capital, a store of authentic knowledge that political and cultural entrepreneurs could draw from. This book shows African heritage to be a mode of political organisation, a means by which the relics of the past are shored up, reconstructed and revalued as commodities, as tradition, as morality or as patrimony.

Ethnic Patriotism and the East African Revival A History of Dissent, c.1935-1972

Ethnic Patriotism and the East African Revival A History of Dissent, c.1935-1972

Author: Derek R. Peterson Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 20/03/2014

Ethnic Patriotism and the East African Revival shows how, in the era of African political independence, cosmopolitan Christian converts struggled with East Africa's patriots over the definition of culture and community. The book traces the history of the East African Revival, an evangelical movement that spread through much of eastern and central Africa. Its converts offered a subversive reading of culture, disavowing their compatriots and disregarding their obligations to kin. They earned the ire of East Africa's patriots, who worked to root people in place as inheritors of ancestral wisdom. This book casts religious conversion in a new light: not as an inward reorientation of belief, but as a political action that opened up novel paths of self-narration and unsettled the inventions of tradition.

Ethnic Patriotism and the East African Revival A History of Dissent, c.1935-1972

Ethnic Patriotism and the East African Revival A History of Dissent, c.1935-1972

Author: Derek R. Peterson Format: Hardback Release Date: 24/09/2012

Ethnic Patriotism and the East African Revival shows how, in the era of African political independence, cosmopolitan Christian converts struggled with East Africa's patriots over the definition of culture and community. The book traces the history of the East African Revival, an evangelical movement that spread through much of eastern and central Africa. Its converts offered a subversive reading of culture, disavowing their compatriots and disregarding their obligations to kin. They earned the ire of East Africa's patriots, who worked to root people in place as inheritors of ancestral wisdom. This book casts religious conversion in a new light: not as an inward reorientation of belief, but as a political action that opened up novel paths of self-narration and unsettled the inventions of tradition.

Recasting the Past History Writing and Political Work in Modern Africa

Recasting the Past History Writing and Political Work in Modern Africa

Author: Derek R. Peterson Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 15/08/2009

The study of intellectual history in Africa is in its infancy. We know very little about what Africa's thinkers made of their times. Recasting the Past brings one field of intellectual endeavor into view. The book takes its place alongside a small but growing literature that highlights how, in autobiographies, historical writing, fiction, and other literary genres, African writers intervened creatively in their political world. The past has already been worked over by the African interpreters that the present volume brings into view. African brokers-pastors, journalists, kingmakers, religious dissidents, politicians, entrepreneurs all-have been doing research, conducting interviews, reading archives, and presenting their results to critical audiences. Their scholarly work makes it impossible to think of African history as an inert entity awaiting the attention of professional historians. Professionals take their place in a broader field of interpretation, where Africans are already reifying, editing, and representing the past. The essays collected in Recasting the Past study the warp and weft of Africa's homespun historical work. Contributors trace the strands of discourse from which historical entrepreneurs drew, highlighting the sources of inspiration and reference that enlivened their work. By illuminating the conventions of the past, Africa's history writers set their contemporary constituents on a path toward a particular future. History writing was a means by which entrepreneurs conjured up constituencies, claimed legitimate authority, and mobilized people around a cause. By illuminating the spheres of debate in which Africa's own scholars participated, Recasting the Past repositions the practice of modern history.

Recasting the Past History Writing and Political Work in Modern Africa

Recasting the Past History Writing and Political Work in Modern Africa

Author: Derek R. Peterson Format: Hardback Release Date: 15/08/2009

The study of intellectual history in Africa is in its infancy. We know very little about what Africa's thinkers made of their times. Recasting the Past brings one field of intellectual endeavor into view. The book takes its place alongside a small but growing literature that highlights how, in autobiographies, historical writing, fiction, and other literary genres, African writers intervened creatively in their political world. The past has already been worked over by the African interpreters that the present volume brings into view. African brokers-pastors, journalists, kingmakers, religious dissidents, politicians, entrepreneurs all-have been doing research, conducting interviews, reading archives, and presenting their results to critical audiences. Their scholarly work makes it impossible to think of African history as an inert entity awaiting the attention of professional historians. Professionals take their place in a broader field of interpretation, where Africans are already reifying, editing, and representing the past. The essays collected in Recasting the Past study the warp and weft of Africa's homespun historical work. Contributors trace the strands of discourse from which historical entrepreneurs drew, highlighting the sources of inspiration and reference that enlivened their work. By illuminating the conventions of the past, Africa's history writers set their contemporary constituents on a path toward a particular future. History writing was a means by which entrepreneurs conjured up constituencies, claimed legitimate authority, and mobilized people around a cause. By illuminating the spheres of debate in which Africa's own scholars participated, Recasting the Past repositions the practice of modern history.