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David R Roediger - Author

About the Author

Books by David R Roediger

Class, Race, and Marxism

Class, Race, and Marxism

Author: David R. Roediger Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 01/10/2019

Seen as a key figure in the critical study of whiteness, US historian David Roediger has sometimes received criticism, and praise, alleging that he left Marxism behind in order to work on questions of identity. This volume collects his recent and new work implicitly and explicitly challenging such a view. In his historical studies of the intersections of race, settler colonialism, and slavery, in his major essay (with Elizabeth Esch) on race and the management of labour, in his detailing of the origins of critical studies of whiteness within Marxism, and in his reflections on the history of solidarity, Roediger argues that racial division is part of not only of the history of capitalism but also of the logic of capital.

How Race Survived Us History From Settlement and Slavery to The Eclipse of Post-Racialism

How Race Survived Us History From Settlement and Slavery to The Eclipse of Post-Racialism

Author: David R Roediger Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 01/10/2019

In this absorbing chronicle of the role of race in US history, David R. Roediger explores how the idea of race was created and recreated from the 1600s to the present day. From the late seventeenth century-the era in which Du Bois located the emergence of whiteness -through the American revolution and the emancipatory Civil War, to the civil rights movement and the emergence of the American empire, How Race Survived US History reveals how race did far more than persist as an exception in a progressive national history. Roediger examines how race intersected all that was dynamic and progressive in US history, from democracy and economic development to migration and globalisation.

Seizing Freedom Slave Emancipation and Liberty for All

Seizing Freedom Slave Emancipation and Liberty for All

Author: David R. Roediger Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 27/10/2015

How did America recover after its years of civil war? How did freed men and women, former slaves, react to their newly won freedoms? Building on, criticizing and extending previous historical accounts of the Reconstruction, David Roediger's radical new history finds fresh sources and texts that redefine the idea of freedom after the jubilee. Reinstating ex-slaves' own freedom dreams in constructing these histories, Roediger creates a masterful account of the emancipation, and its ramifications on a whole host of day-to-day concerns for whites and black alike, such as property relations, labor, and gender roles.

How Race Survived US History From Settlement and Slavery to the Obama Phenomenon

How Race Survived US History From Settlement and Slavery to the Obama Phenomenon

Author: David R. Roediger Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 01/02/2010

This book features an acclaimed exploration of how the idea of race was created and recreated in American history. From the late seventeenth century to the civil-rights movement and the emergence of the American empire, David Roediger examines how race intersected all that was dynamic and progressive in US history, from democracy and economic development to migration and globalization and shows how race remains at the heart of American life in the twenty-first century.

The Wages of Whiteness Race and the Making of the American Working Class

The Wages of Whiteness Race and the Making of the American Working Class

Author: David R. Roediger Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 27/06/2007

This is the new, fully updated edition of this now-classic study of working-class racism. Combining classical Marxism, psychoanalysis and the new labor history pioneered by E. P. Thompson and Herbert Gutman, David Roediger's widely acclaimed book provides an original study of the formative years of working-class racism in the United States. This, he argues, cannot be explained simply with reference to economic advantage; rather, white working-class racism is underpinned by a complex series of psychological and ideological mechanisms that reinforce racial stereotypes, and thus help to forge the identities of white workers in opposition to blacks. In a lengthy new introduction, Roediger surveys recent scholarship on whiteness, and discusses the changing face of labor in the twenty-first century.

The Wages of Whiteness Race and the Making of the American Working Class

The Wages of Whiteness Race and the Making of the American Working Class

Author: David R. Roediger Format: Hardback Release Date: 27/06/2007

This is the new, fully updated edition of this now-classic study of working-class racism. Combining classical Marxism, psychoanalysis and the new labor history pioneered by E. P. Thompson and Herbert Gutman, David Roediger's widely acclaimed book provides an original study of the formative years of working-class racism in the United States. This, he argues, cannot be explained simply with reference to economic advantage; rather, white working-class racism is underpinned by a complex series of psychological and ideological mechanisms that reinforce racial stereotypes, and thus help to forge the identities of white workers in opposition to blacks. In a lengthy new introduction, Roediger surveys recent scholarship on whiteness, and discusses the changing face of labor in the twenty-first century.

Working Toward Whiteness

Working Toward Whiteness

Author: David R. Roediger Format: eBook Release Date: 08/08/2006

How did immigrants to the United States come to see themselves as white? David R. Roediger has been in the vanguard of the study of race and labor in American history for decades. He first came to prominence as the author of The Wages of Whiteness, a classic study of racism in the development of a white working class in nineteenth-century America. In Working Toward Whiteness, Roediger continues that history into the twentieth century. He recounts how ethnic groups considered white today-including Jewish-, Italian-, and Polish-Americans-were once viewed as undesirables by the WASP establishment in the United States. They eventually became part of white America, through the nascent labor movement, New Deal reforms, and a rise in home-buying. Once assimilated as fully white, many of them adopted the racism of those whites who formerly looked down on them as inferior. From ethnic slurs to racially restrictive covenants-the real estate agreements that ensured all-white neighborhoods-Roediger explores the mechanisms by which immigrants came to enjoy the privileges of being white in America. A disturbing, necessary, masterful history, Working Toward Whiteness uses the past to illuminate the present. In an Introduction to the 2018 edition, Roediger considers the resonance of the book in the age of Trump, showing how Working Toward Whiteness remains as relevant as ever even though most migrants today are not from Europe.

Colored White Transcending the Racial Past

Colored White Transcending the Racial Past

Author: David R. Roediger Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 04/11/2003

David R. Roediger's powerful book argues that in its political workings, its distribution of advantages, and its unspoken assumptions, the United States is a 'still white' nation. Race is decidedly not over. The critical portraits of contemporary icons that lead off the book - Rush Limbaugh, Bill Clinton, O.J. Simpson, and Rudolph Giuliani - insist that continuities in white power and white identity are best understood by placing the recent past in historical context. Roediger illuminates that history in an incisive critique of the current scholarship on whiteness and an account of race-transcending radicalism exemplified by vanguards such as W.E.B. Du Bois and John Brown. He shows that, for all of its staying power, white supremacy in the United States has always been a pursuit rather than a completed project, that divisions among whites have mattered greatly, and that 'nonwhite' alternatives have profoundly challenged the status quo. Colored White reasons that, because race is a matter of culture and politics, racial oppression will not be solved by intermarriage or demographic shifts, but rather by political struggles that transform the meaning of race - especially its links to social and economic inequality. This landmark work considers the ways that changes in immigration patterns, the labor force, popular culture, and social movements make it possible - though far from inevitable - that the United States might overcome white supremacy in the twenty-first century. Roediger's clear, lively prose and his extraordinary command of the literature make this one of the most original and generative contributions to the study of race and ethnicity in the United States in many decades.

Towards the Abolition of Whiteness Essays on Race, Class and Politics

Towards the Abolition of Whiteness Essays on Race, Class and Politics

Author: David R. Roediger Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 02/02/1994

Towards the Abolition of Whiteness collects David Roediger's recent essays, many published here for the first time, and counts the costs of whiteness in the past and present in the US. It finds those costs insupportable. At a time when prevailing liberal wisdom argues for the downplaying of race in the hope of building coalitions dedicated to economic reform, Roediger wants to open, not close, debates on the privileges and miseries associated with being white. He closely examines the way in which white identities have historically prepared white Americans to accept the oppression of others, the emptiness of their own lives, and the impossibility of change. Whether discussing popular culture, race and ethnicity, the evolution of such American keywords as gook, boss and redneck, the strikes of 1877 or the election of 1992, Roediger pushes at the boundaries between labor history and politics, as well as those between race and class, Alive to tension within what James Baldwin called 'the lie of whiteness', Roediger explores the record of dissent from white identity, especially in the cultural realm, and encourages the search for effective political challenges to whiteness.

Our Own Time History of American Labour and the Working Day

Our Own Time History of American Labour and the Working Day

Author: David R. Roediger, Philip Sheldon Foner Format: Paperback / softback Release Date: 22/09/1989

Our Own Time retells the history of American labor by focusing on the politics of time and the movements for a shorter working day. It argues that the length of the working day has been the central issue for the American labor movement during its most vigorous periods of activity, uniting workers along lines of craft, gender and ethnicity. The authors hold that the workweek is likely again to take on increased significance as workers face the choice between a society based on free time and one based on alienated work and employment.

Our Own Time A History of American Labor and the Working Day

Our Own Time A History of American Labor and the Working Day

Author: David R. Roediger, Philip S. Foner Format: Hardback Release Date: 27/03/1989

Our Own Time provides the first full account of the movement to shorten the working day in the United States. Combining the narrative and trade union emphasis of traditional labor history with the focus on culture and the labor process characteristic of contemporary labor history, the book offers an illuminating reinterpretation of the history of the U.S. labor movement from the colonial period onward. The authors argue that the length of the working day or week historically has been the central issue raised by the American labor movement during its most vigorous periods of organization. Beginning with a picture of working hours in colonial America and the early republic, Roediger and Foner then analyze the ideology of the movement for a ten-hour workday in the early nineteenth century. They demonstrate that the ten-hour issue was a key to the dynamism of the Jacksonian labor movement as well as to the unity of male artisans and female factory workers in the 1840s. The authors proceed to examine the subsequent demands for an eight-hour day, which helped to produce the mass labor struggles of the late nineteenth century and established the American Federation of Labor as the dominant force in American trade unionism. Chapters on labor movement defeats following World War I, on the depression years, and on the lack of progress over the last half-century complete the study. Our Own Time will be an ideal supplemental text for courses in U.S. labor and economic history.