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Europe Audiobooks in Travel

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LoveReading Top 10

  1. Too Much and Never Enough: How My Family Created the World's Most Dangerous Man Audiobook Too Much and Never Enough: How My Family Created the World's Most Dangerous Man
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  2. The Sin Eater Audiobook The Sin Eater
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  3. Stamped: Racism, Antiracism, and You: A Remix of the National Book Award-winning Stamped from the Be Audiobook Stamped: Racism, Antiracism, and You: A Remix of the National Book Award-winning Stamped from the Be
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  4. Near Dark: A Thriller Audiobook Near Dark: A Thriller
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  5. Coming Home to Island House Audiobook Coming Home to Island House
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  6. Outsider: A Novel of Suspense Audiobook Outsider: A Novel of Suspense
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  7. What You Wish For: A Novel Audiobook What You Wish For: A Novel
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  8. The Alchemist Audiobook The Alchemist
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  9. Relationship Goals: How to Win at Dating, Marriage, and Sex Audiobook Relationship Goals: How to Win at Dating, Marriage, and Sex
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  10. Tempt Me Audiobook Tempt Me
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A Journey Audiobook

A Journey

Author: Tony Blair Narrator: Tony Blair Release Date: September 2010

In 1997, Tony Blair won the biggest Labour victory in history to sweep the party to power and end 18 years of Conservative government. He has been one of the most dynamic leaders of modern times; few British prime ministers have shaped the nation's course as profoundly as Blair during his ten years in power, and his achievements and his legacy will be debated for years to come. Now his memoirs reveal in intimate detail this unique political and personal journey, providing an insight into the man, the politician and the statesman, and charting successes, controversies and disappointments with an extraordinary candour. The Journey will prove essential and compulsive reading for anyone who wants to understand the complexities of our global world. As an account of the nature and uses of power, it will also have a readership that extends well beyond politics, to all those who want to understand the challenges of leadership today.

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A Magnificent Obsession: Victoria, Albert, and the Death That Changed the British Monarchy Audiobook

A Magnificent Obsession: Victoria, Albert, and the Death That Changed the British Monarchy

Author: Helen Rappaport Narrator: Wanda McCaddon Release Date: April 2012

After the untimely death of Prince Albert, the Queen and her nation were plunged into a state of grief so profound that this one event would dramatically alter the shape of the British monarchy. For Britain had not just lost a prince: during his twenty year marriage to Queen Victoria, Prince Albert had increasingly performed the function of King in all but name. The outpouring of grief after Albert's death was so extreme, that its like would not be seen again until the death of Princess Diana one hundred and thirty-six years later. Drawing on many letters, diaries and memoirs from the Royal Archives and other neglected sources, as well as the newspapers of the day, Helen Rappaport offers a new perspective on this compelling historical psychodrama-the crucial final months of the prince's life and the first long, dark ten years of the Queen's retreat from public view. She draws a portrait of a queen obsessed with her husband and-after his death-with his enduring place in history. Magnificent Obsession also sheds new light on the true nature of the prince's chronic physical condition, overturning for good the one hundred and fifty-year-old myth that he died of typhoid fever.

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A Man of Contradictions: A Life of A.L. Rowse Audiobook

A Man of Contradictions: A Life of A.L. Rowse

Author: Richard Ollard Narrator: Geoffrey Howard Release Date: August 2003

A.L. Rowse, who died in 1997, was the author of a vast number of books, all of them readable and most of them fiercely arrayed against what he considered to be declining standards of manners, morals, and politics. He was more than a mere curmudgeon, though. His background was extraordinary: from a working-class family, he got a scholarship to Oxford, and from there was elected to All Souls College, the most exclusive of all faculties. He was a Shakespearean scholar who identified the Dark Lady of the sonnets, a historian of vast scope, and a biographer and memoirist, most notably of his beloved Cornwall. He never shied from controversy, and tore great chunks out of other writers in print. In short, Rowse led a fascinating life that bears reading about.

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A Needle in the Right Hand of God: The Norman Conquest of 1066 and the Making and Meaning of the Bay Audiobook

A Needle in the Right Hand of God: The Norman Conquest of 1066 and the Making and Meaning of the Bay

Author: R. Howard Bloch Narrator: Stephen Hoye Release Date: February 2007

The Bayeux Tapestry is the world's most famous textile-an exquisite 230-foot-long embroidered panorama depicting the events surrounding the Norman Conquest of 1066. It is also one of history's most mysterious and compelling works of art. This haunting stitched account of the battle that redrew the map of medieval Europe has inspired dreams of theft, waves of nationalism, visions of limitless power, and esthetic rapture. In his fascinating new book, Yale professor R. Howard Bloch reveals the history, the hidden meaning, the deep beauty, and the enduring allure of this astonishing piece of cloth. Bloch opens with a gripping account of the event that inspired the Tapestry: the swift, bloody Battle of Hastings, in which the Norman bastard William defeated the Anglo-Saxon king, Harold, and laid claim to England under his new title, William the Conqueror. But to truly understand the connection between battle and embroidery, one must retrace the web of international intrigue and scandal that climaxed at Hastings. Bloch demonstrates how, with astonishing intimacy and immediacy, the artisans who fashioned this work of textile art brought to life a moment that changed the course of British culture and history. Every age has cherished the Tapestry for different reasons and read new meaning into its enigmatic words and images. French nationalists in the mid-nineteenth century, fired by the Tapestry's evocation of military glory, unearthed the lost French epic "The Song of Roland," which Norman troops sang as they marched to victory in 1066. As the Nazis tightened their grip on Europe, Hitler sent a team to France to study the Tapestry, decode its Nordic elements, and, at the end of the war, with Paris under siege, bring the precious cloth to Berlin. The richest horde of buried Anglo-Saxon treasure, the matchless beauty of Byzantine silk, Aesop's strange fable "The Swallow and the Linseed," the colony that Anglo-Saxon nobles founded in the Middle East following their defeat at Hastings-all are brilliantly woven into Bloch's riveting narrative. Seamlessly integrating Norman, Anglo-Saxon, Viking, and Byzantine elements, the Bayeux Tapestry ranks with Chartres and the Tower of London as a crowning achievement of medieval Europe. And yet, more than a work of art, the Tapestry served as the suture that bound up the wounds of 1066. A Needle in the Right Hand of God will stand with The Professor and the Madman and How the Irish Saved Civilization as a triumph of popular history.

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A People Betrayed: A History of Corruption, Political Incompetence and Social Division in Modern Spa Audiobook

A People Betrayed: A History of Corruption, Political Incompetence and Social Division in Modern Spa

Author: Paul Preston Narrator: Peter Noble Release Date: March 2020

From the foremost historian of 20th century Spain, A People Betrayed is the story of the devastating betrayal of Spain by its political class, its military and its Church. This comprehensive history of modern Spain chronicles the fomenting of violent social division throughout the country by institutionalised corruption and startling political incompetence. Most spectacularly during the Primo de Rivera and Franco dictatorships, grotesque and shameless corruption went hand-in-hand with inept policies that prolonged Spain’s economic backwardness well into the 1950s. A People Betrayed looks back to the years prior to 1923 when electoral corruption excluded the masses from organized politics and gave them a choice between apathetic acceptance and violent revolution. Bitter social conflict, economic tensions and conflict between centralist nationalism and regional independence movements then exploded into the civil war of 1936-1939. It took the horrors of that war and the dictatorship that followed to break the pattern. The moderation shared by the progressive right and a chastened left underlay a bloodless transition to democracy after 1975. Yet, as before, corruption and political incompetence continued to have a corrosive effect on political coexistence and social cohesion. Sparkling with vivid portraits of politicians and army officers, some corrupt and others clean, recounting the triumphs and disasters of Kings Alfonso XIII and Juan Carlos, A People Betrayed unravels the mystery of why both right and left have been unable or unwilling to deal with corruption and the pernicious clash between Spanish centralist nationalism and regional desires for independence.

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A Pilgrimage to Eternity: From Canterbury to Rome in Search of a Faith Audiobook

A Pilgrimage to Eternity: From Canterbury to Rome in Search of a Faith

Author: Timothy Egan Narrator: Timothy Egan Release Date: October 2019

Tracing an ancient pilgrimage route from Canterbury to Rome, the bestselling and 'virtuosic' (The Wall Street Journal) writer explores the past and future of Christianity 'What a wondrous work! This beautifully written and totally clear-eyed account of his pilgrimage will have you wondering whether we should all embark on such a journey, either of the body, the soul or, as in Egan's case, both.' --Cokie Roberts Moved by his mother's death and his Irish Catholic family's complicated history with the church, Timothy Egan decided to follow in the footsteps of centuries of seekers to force a reckoning with his own beliefs. He embarked on a thousand-mile pilgrimage through the theological cradle of Christianity, exploring one of the biggest stories of our time: the collapse of religion in the world that it created. Egan sets out along the Via Francigena, once the major medieval trail leading the devout to Rome, and makes his way overland via the alpine peaks and small mountain towns of France, Switzerland and Italy. The goal: walking to St. Peter's Square, in hopes of meeting the galvanizing pope who is struggling to hold together the church through the worst crisis in half a millennium. Making his way through a landscape laced with some of the most important shrines to the faith, Egan finds a modern Canterbury Tale in the chapel where Queen Bertha introduced Christianity to pagan Britain; parses the supernatural in a French town built on miracles; and journeys to the oldest abbey in the Western world, founded in 515 and home to continuous prayer over the 1,500 years that have followed. He is accompanied by a quirky cast of fellow pilgrims and by some of the towering figures of the faith--Joan of Arc, Henry VIII, Martin Luther. A thrilling journey, a family story, and a revealing history, A Pilgrimage to Eternity looks for our future in its search for God.

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A Precautionary Tale: How One Small Town Banned Pesticides, Preserved Its Food Heritage, and Inspire Audiobook

A Precautionary Tale: How One Small Town Banned Pesticides, Preserved Its Food Heritage, and Inspire

Author: Philip Ackerman-Leist Narrator: Will Damron Release Date: November 2017

Mals, Italy, has long been known as the breadbasket of the Tyrol. But recently the tiny town became known for something else entirely. A Precautionary Tale tells us why, introducing readers to an unlikely group of activists and a forward-thinking mayor who came together to ban pesticides in Mals by a referendum vote-making it the first place on Earth to accomplish such a feat, and a model for other towns and regions to follow. For hundreds of years, the people of Mals had cherished their traditional foodways and kept their local agriculture organic. Their town had become a mecca for tourists drawn by the alpine landscape, the rural and historic character of the villages, and the fine breads, wines, cheeses, herbs, vegetables, and the other traditional foods they produced. Yet Mals is located high up in the eastern Alps, and the valley below was being steadily overtaken by big apple producers, heavily dependent on pesticides. As Big Apple crept further and further up the region's mountainsides, their toxic spray drifted with the valley's ever-present winds and began to fall on the farms and fields of Mals-threatening their organic certifications, as well as their health and that of their livestock.  The advancing threats gradually motivated a diverse cast of characters to take action-each in their own unique way, and then in concert in an iconic display of direct democracy in action. As Ackerman-Leist recounts their uprising, we meet an organic dairy farmer who decides to speak up when his hay is poisoned by drift; a pediatrician who engaged other medical professionals to protect the soil, water, and air that the health of her patients depends upon; a hairdresser whose salon conversations mobilized the town's women in an extraordinarily conceived campaign; and others who together orchestrated one of the rare revolutionary successes of our time and inspired a movement now snaking its way through Europe and the United States. A foreword by Vandana Shiva calls upon others to follow in Mals's footsteps.

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A Rare Recording of Lord Haw-Haw Audiobook

A Rare Recording of Lord Haw-Haw

Author: Lord Haw-Haw Narrator: Lord Haw-Haw Release Date: October 2019

Lord Haw-Haw was a nickname given to the American-born Brit, William Joyce, who broadcast Nazi propaganda to Britain from Germany during the Second World War. Lord Haw-Haw was a Nazi broadcaster during World War II. Joyce emigrated to Germany and broadcast Nazi messages for several years. The Reich Ministry of Propaganda used these broadcasts to discourage and demoralize Allied forces and the British population by exaggerating their war losses. Up to 60% of the British population actually tuned in to Lord Haw-Haw's broadcasts. They lasted from 1939-1945. Eventually Joyce was captured by Allied forces and brought back to England for trial. He was convicted of treason and hanged on January 3, 1946. This recording from April 9, 1940 is about the Nazi invasion of Denmark and Norway.

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A Really Short History of the Norman Conquest of England Audiobook

A Really Short History of the Norman Conquest of England

Author: Edward Augustus Freeman, Man With A Cat Narrator: Man With A Cat Release Date: February 2019

The Norman Conquest of England was that series of events during the latter part of the eleventh century by which a Norman Duke was set on the throne of England, and was enabled to hand down the crown of England to his descendants. The Norman Conquest of England does in truth mean a great deal more than the mere transfer of the crown from one prince or one family to another, or even than the transfer of the crown from a prince born in the land to a prince who came from beyond the sea. It means a great number of changes of all kinds which have made the history and state of England ever since very different from what they would have been if the Norman Conquest had never happened.

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A Serial Killer in Nazi Berlin: The Chilling True Story of the S-Bahn Murderer Audiobook

A Serial Killer in Nazi Berlin: The Chilling True Story of the S-Bahn Murderer

Author: Scott Andrew Selby Narrator: Don Hagen Release Date: February 2014

As the Nazi war machine caused death and destruction throughout Europe, one man in the Fatherland began his own reign of terror. This is the true story of the pursuit and capture of a serial killer in the heart of the Third Reich. For all appearances, Paul Ogorzow was a model German. An employed family man, party member, and sergeant in the infamous Brownshirts, he had worked his way up in the Berlin railroad from a manual laborer laying track to assistant signalman. But he also had a secret need to harass and frighten women. Then he was given a gift from the Nazi high command. Due to Allied bombing raids, a total blackout was instituted throughout Berlin, including on the commuter trains-trains often used by women riding home alone from the factories. Under cover of darkness and with a helpless flock of victims to choose from, Ogorzow's depredations grew more and more horrific. He escalated from simply frightening women to physically attacking them, eventually raping and murdering them. Beginning in September 1940, he started casually tossing their bodies off the moving train. Though the Nazi party tried to censor news of the attacks, the women of Berlin soon lived in a state of constant fear. It was up to Wilhelm Lüdtke, head of the Berlin police's serious crimes division, to hunt down the madman in their midst. For the first time, the gripping full story of Ogorzow's killing spree and Lüdtke's relentless pursuit is told in dramatic detail.

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A Short History of Drunkenness Audiobook

A Short History of Drunkenness

Author: Mark Forsyth Narrator: Richard Hughes Release Date: November 2017

Penguin presents the audiobook edition of A Short History of Drunkenness by Mark Forsyth, read by Sh*tfaced Shakespeare's Richard Hughes. Almost every culture on earth has drink, and where there's drink there's drunkenness. But in every age and in every place drunkenness is a little bit different. It can be religious, it can be sexual, it can be the duty of kings or the relief of peasants. It can be an offering to the ancestors, or a way of marking the end of a day's work. It can send you to sleep, or send you into battle. A Short History of Drunkenness traces humankind's love affair with booze from our primate ancestors through to Prohibition, answering every possible question along the way: What did people drink? How much? Who did the drinking? Of the many possible reasons, why? On the way, learn about the Neolithic Shamans, who drank to communicate with the spirit world (no pun intended), marvel at how Greeks got giddy and Romans got rat-arsed, and find out how bars in the Wild West were never quite like in the movies. This is a history of the world at its inebriated best.

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A Short History of Europe: From Pericles to Putin Audiobook

A Short History of Europe: From Pericles to Putin

Author: Simon Jenkins Narrator: Simon Jenkins Release Date: November 2018

Penguin presents the audiobook edition of A Short History of Europe written and read by Simon Jenkins. Europe is an astonishingly successful place. In this dazzling new history, bestselling author Simon Jenkins grippingly tells the story of its evolution from warring peoples to peace, wealth and freedom - a story that twists and turns from Greece and Rome, through the Dark Ages, the Reformation and the French Revolution, to the Second World War and up to the present day. Jenkins takes in leaders from Julius Caesar and Joan of Arc, to Wellington and Angela Merkel, as well as cultural figures from Aristotle to Shakespeare and Picasso. He brings together the transformative forces and dominant eras into one chronological tale - all with his usual insight, colour and authority. Despite the importance of Europe's politics, economy and culture, there has not been - until now - a concise book to tell this story. Covering the key events, themes and individuals, Jenkins' portrait of the continent could not be more timely - or masterful.

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