Asia Audiobooks in Travel

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  6. Impostor: An Alexander Gregory Thriller (The Alexander Gregory Thrillers Book 1): The Alexander Greg Audiobook Impostor: An Alexander Gregory Thriller (The Alexander Gregory Thrillers Book 1): The Alexander Greg
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  8. The Storyteller: Tales of Life and Music Audiobook The Storyteller: Tales of Life and Music
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  9. Humanocracy: Creating Organizations as Amazing as the People Inside Them Audiobook Humanocracy: Creating Organizations as Amazing as the People Inside Them
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The Long March: The True History of Communist China's Founding Myth Audiobook

The Long March: The True History of Communist China's Founding Myth

Author: Sun Shuyun Narrator: Laural Merlington Release Date: June 2007

The 8,000-mile journey undertaken by the fledgling Chinese Communist Party in 1934 is considered the defining moment of modern Chinese history. Seventy years later, Sun Shuyun set out to retrace the marchers' steps and to interview the aged survivors. The Long March is the stunning narrative of her extraordinary expedition. It is a gripping retelling of an amazing historical adventure, an eye-opening account of how Mao manipulated it for his own purposes, and a moving portrait of China past and present.

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Nixon and Mao: The Week That Changed the World Audiobook

Nixon and Mao: The Week That Changed the World

Author: Margaret MacMillan Narrator: Barbara Caruso Release Date: February 2007

With the publication of her landmark bestseller Paris 1919, Margaret MacMillan was praised as "a superb writer who can bring history to life" (The Philadelphia Inquirer). Now she brings her extraordinary gifts to one of the most important subjects today-the relationship between the United States and China-and one of the most significant moments in modern history. In February 1972, Richard Nixon, the first American president ever to visit China, and Mao Tse-tung, the enigmatic Communist dictator, met for an hour in Beijing. Their meeting changed the course of history and ultimately laid the groundwork for the complex relationship between China and the United States that we see today. That monumental meeting in 1972-during what Nixon called "the week that changed the world"-could have been brought about only by powerful leaders: Nixon himself, a great strategist and a flawed human being, and Mao, willful and ruthless. They were assisted by two brilliant and complex statesmen, Henry Kissinger and Chou En-lai. Surrounding them were fascinating people with unusual roles to play, including the enormously disciplined and unhappy Pat Nixon and a small-time Shanghai actress turned monstrous empress, Jiang Qing. And behind all of them lay the complex history of two countries, two great and equally confident civilizations: China, ancient and contemptuous yet fearful of barbarians beyond the Middle Kingdom, and the United States, forward-looking and confident, seeing itself as the beacon for the world. Nixon thought China could help him get out of Vietnam. Mao needed American technology and expertise to repair the damage of the Cultural Revolution. Both men wanted an ally against an aggressive Soviet Union. Did they get what they wanted? Did Mao betray his own revolutionary ideals? How did the people of China react to this apparent change in attitude toward the imperialist Americans? Did Nixon make a mistake in coming to China as a supplicant? And what has been the impact of the visit on the United States ever since? Weaving together fascinating anecdotes and insights, an understanding of Chinese and American history, and the momentous events of an extraordinary time, this brilliantly written book looks at one of the transformative moments of the twentieth century and casts new light on a key relationship for the world of the twenty-first century.

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Dragon Sea: A True Tale of Treasure, Archeology, and Greed Off the Coast of Vietnam Audiobook

Dragon Sea: A True Tale of Treasure, Archeology, and Greed Off the Coast of Vietnam

Author: Frank Pope Narrator: Johnny Heller Release Date: January 2007

Frank Pope recounts the story of a highly successful yet also ill-fated underwater archeological expedition off the coast of Vietnam.

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Afghanistan Audiobook

Afghanistan

Author: Stephen Tanner Narrator: Raymond Todd Release Date: January 2007

For over 2,500 years, the forbidding territory of Afghanistan has served as a vital crossroads not only for armies but also for clashes between civilizations. An understanding of the military history of that blood-soaked land is essential now as America faces a new enemy on this land, a land that for centuries has become a graveyard of empires past. “Recounts with brisk authority and many illuminating analogies…This is a noteworthy and valuable book.”—Amazon.com, editorial review

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Vietnam: A History Audiobook

Vietnam: A History

Author: Stanley Karnow Narrator: Edward Holland Release Date: January 2007

In this comprehensive history, Stanley Karnow demystifies the tragic ordeal of America's war in Vietnam. The book's central theme is that America's leaders, prompted as much by domestic politics as by global ambitions, carried the United States into Southeast Asia with little regard for the realities of the region. Karnow elucidates the decision-making process in Washington and Asia and recounts the political and military events that occurred after the Americans arrived in Vietnam. Throughout, he focuses on people, those who shaped strategy and those who suffered, died, or survived as a result. Panoramic in scope and filled with fresh revelations drawn from secret documents and from exclusive interviews with hundreds of participants on both sides, Vietnam: A History transcends the past with lessons relevant to the present and future. "This is history writing at its best."-Chicago Sun Times

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The Punishment of Virtue: Inside Afghanistan After the Taliban Audiobook

The Punishment of Virtue: Inside Afghanistan After the Taliban

Author: Sarah Chayes Narrator: Renee Raudman Release Date: October 2006

A National Public Radio reporter covering the last stand of the Taliban in their home base of Kandahar in Afghanistan's southern borderland, Sarah Chayes became deeply immersed in the unfolding drama of the attempt to rebuild a broken nation at the crossroads of the world's destiny. Her NPR tour up in early 2002, she left reporting to help turn the country's fortunes, accepting a job running a nonprofit founded by President Hamid Karzai's brother. With remarkable access to leading players in the postwar government, Chayes witnessed a tragic story unfold-the perverse turn of events whereby the U.S. government and armed forces allowed and abetted the return to power of corrupt militia commanders to the country, as well as the reinfiltration of bands of Taliban forces supported by U.S. ally Pakistan. In this gripping and dramatic account of her four years on the ground, working with Afghanis in the battle to restore their country to order and establish democracy, Chayes opens Americans' eyes to the sobering realities of this vital front in the war on terror. She forged unparalleled relationships with the Karzai family, tribal leaders, U.S. military and diplomatic brass, and such leading figures in the Kandahar government as the imposing and highly effective chief of police-an incorruptible supporter of the Karzai regime whose brutal assassination in June 2005 serves as the opening of the book. Chayes lived in an Afghan home, gaining rich insights into the country's culture and politics and researching the history of Afghanistan's legendary resistance to foreign interference. She takes us into meetings with Hamid Karzai and the corrupt Kandahar governor, Gul Agha Shirzai, into the homes of tribal elders and onto the U.S. military base. Unveiling the complexities and traumas of Afghanistan's postwar struggles, she reveals how the tribal strongmen who have regained power-after years of being displaced by the Taliban-have visited a renewed plague of corruption and violence on the Afghan people, under the complicit eyes of U.S. forces and officials. The story Chayes tells is a powerful, disturbing revelation of misguided U.S. policy and of the deeply entrenched traditions of tribal warlordism that have ruled Afghanistan through the centuries.

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Just Americans: How Japanese Americans Won a War at Home and Abroad Audiobook

Just Americans: How Japanese Americans Won a War at Home and Abroad

Author: Robert Asahina Narrator: Patrick Lawlor Release Date: August 2006

The dramatic story of the segregated Japanese-American 100th Battalion/442d Regimental Combat Team reveals, as Gen. Jacob L. Evers puts it, in World War II these soldiers "more than earned the right to be called just American, not Japanese Americans."

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Mao: The Unknown Story Audiobook

Mao: The Unknown Story

Author: Jon Halliday, Jung Chang Narrator: Robertson Dean Release Date: March 2006

“Ever since the spectacular success of Chang’s Wild Swans we have waited impatiently for her to complete with her husband this monumental study of China’s most notorious modern leader. The expectation has been that she would rewrite modern Chinese history. The wait has been worthwhile and the expectation justified. This is a bombshell of a book.” –Chris Patten, the last governor of Hong Kong, in The Times (London) Based on a decade of research and on interviews with many of Mao’s close circle in China who have never talked before–and with virtually everyone outside China who had significant dealings with him–this is the most authoritative life of Mao ever written. It is full of startling revelations, exploding the myth of the Long March, and showing a completely unknown Mao: he was not driven by idealism or ideology; his intimate and intricate relationship with Stalin went back to the 1920s, ultimately bringing him to power; he welcomed Japanese occupation of much of China; and he schemed, poisoned and blackmailed to get his way. After Mao conquered China in 1949, his secret goal was to dominate the world. In chasing this dream he caused the deaths of 38 million people in the greatest famine in history. In all, well over 70 million Chinese perished under Mao’s rule–in peacetime. Combining meticulous research with the story-telling style of Wild Swans, this biography offers a harrowing portrait of Mao’s ruthless accumulation of power through the exercise of terror: his first victims were the peasants, then the intellectuals and, finally, the inner circle of his own advisors. The reader enters the shadowy chambers of Mao’s court and eavesdrops on the drama in its hidden recesses. Mao’s character and the enormity of his behavior toward his wives, mistresses and children are unveiled for the first time. This is an entirely fresh look at Mao in both content and approach. It will astonish historians and the general reader alike.

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The Philippines Audiobook

The Philippines

Author: Joseph Stromberg Narrator: Harry Reasoner, Peter Hackes, Richard C. Hottelet Release Date: March 2006

Strategically located, The Philippine Islands have been one of the keys to American policy in the Pacific. But this loose island chain has a better history, vacillating between oppression and rebellion. America's military installations here ensure that she will be caught in any Filipino conflict.

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The Korean War/Vietnam Part1 Audiobook

The Korean War/Vietnam Part1

Author: Wendy McElroy Narrator: George C. Scott Release Date: March 2006

After WWII, Korea was divided in half at the 38th parallel. To the north were the Communists; to the south were the United Nations peacekeeping forces. In June 1950, North Korean soldiers backed by Soviet-built tanks poured across the parallel. The Korean conflict became on of the first expressions of the Cold War between Russia and America. It was an attempt to balance the power that had been thrown so badly out of alignment by WWII. But Korea would bring victory to neither side. It would merely reaffirm the deadlock. In 1954, the country of Vietnam was also divided in half – at the 17th parallel. To the north was the Communist regime of Ho Chi Mihn; to the south was the America-backed regime of Ngo Dihn Diem. Elections to unify the country were scheduled for 1956, but they were never held. Instead, each side used military means to accomplish political goals. To America, Vietnam symbolized her ability to contain communism in Asia. To the Communists, Vietnam symbolized their ability to defeat America in warfare. It became a struggle to the death between East and West – not only between military forces but also between opposing ideologies. Meanwhile, the fabric of Vietnamese society had been torn apart. By 1961, the Cold War was escalating with John F. Kennedy in the White House and Nikita Khrushchev in the Kremlin. Both Sides held nuclear weapons, and they tested each other for weakness. But, by 1964, Kennedy had been assassinated and the Soviets were at odds with communist China. The new American president, Lyndon B. Johnson, found himself trapped in a war without end. His solution was to escalate America’s military commitment in Vietnam. Between November 1963 and July 1965, Johnson transformed America’s limited engagement in Vietnam into an open-ended commitment. Continuing this strategy, President Richard M. Nixon ordered one of the most criticized events of the war - the bombing of Cambodia. American opinion clamored for an end to war, and eventually prevailed. The names of more than 58,000 Americans are inscribed on a black granite monument in Washington, D.C., memorializing those who died in Vietnam.

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The Philosophies of India Audiobook

The Philosophies of India

Author: Professor Douglas Allen Narrator: Lynn Redgrave Release Date: March 2006

India has perhaps the oldest living philosophical tradition in the world. Its philosophies share five general characteristics: (1) an affirmation that there's an ultimate reality (such as Brahman or Atman) based in spiritual realization (such as Moksha or Nirvana); (2) attention to the worldly cycles of birth and death (known as Samsara or Maya), involving such things as evil, ignorance, suffering, and bondage; (3) a belief in rebirth or reincarnation; (4) a belief in Karma, a law of moral causation based on past actions; and (5) an emphasis on Dharma, or moral duty. Though Indian philosophies affirm the reality of both spirit and matter, their predominant emphasis is on the spiritual ideal. Indian philosophy also is inclusivistic, embracing many alternatives or paths to one ultimate reality. Hindus affirm four aims of life: artha (material possessions), kama (love), dharma (duty & morality), and moksha (spiritual freedom). Buddhism and Jainism began in India, but India's predominant philosophical influence has been the Vedic tradition. The Vedas (meaning knowledge or wisdom, written between 1500-500 BCE) are the fundamental Hindu scriptures and the basis of orthodox Hindu philosophies, which may be divided into six main philosophical systems: (1) Nyaya, involving logic and theory of knowledge; (2) Vaisheshika, affirming that reality consists of real atoms; (3) Sankhya, which affirms the dualism of physical/mental or natural/spiritual phenomena; (4) Yoga, which "yokes" or "unites" matter and spirit through various exercises; (5) Mamamsa, which focuses on Vedic duty and ritual; and (6) Vedanta, which emphasizes one pure, all-encompassing spiritual reality. The best known recent figures of Indian philosophy are Mohandas Gandhi and Sarvepalli Radhakrishnan, who were major political leaders and cultural figures in India.

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The Golden Triangle Audiobook

The Golden Triangle

Author: Bertil Lintner Narrator: Harry Reasoner, Peter Hackes, Richard C. Hottelet Release Date: March 2006

Thailand, Laos and Burma have been known as the "Golden Triangle" because of their historically prominent role in the drug trade. For centuries, these countries have produced the opium that has attracted traders from Europe and elsewhere. Economics, religion, and politics combine to make this area not only important but also (to the western mind) exotic.

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