Audiobooks by Daniel Carpenter

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LoveReading Top 10

  1. The Silence of Scheherazade Audiobook The Silence of Scheherazade
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  2. Think Big: Take Small Steps and Build the Future You Want Audiobook Think Big: Take Small Steps and Build the Future You Want
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  3. Appetite: A Memoir in Recipes of Family and Food Audiobook Appetite: A Memoir in Recipes of Family and Food
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  4. A Line to Kill: from the global bestselling author of Moonflower Murders Audiobook A Line to Kill: from the global bestselling author of Moonflower Murders
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  5. Such a Quiet Place Audiobook Such a Quiet Place
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  6. 1979 Audiobook 1979
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  7. The Reckoning: America's Trauma and Finding a Way to Heal Audiobook The Reckoning: America's Trauma and Finding a Way to Heal
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  8. Land of Big Numbers Audiobook Land of Big Numbers
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  9. Gene Keys: Embracing Your Higher Purpose Audiobook Gene Keys: Embracing Your Higher Purpose
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  10. What We Find Audiobook What We Find
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Democracy by Petition: Popular Politics in Transformation, 1790-1870 Audiobook

Democracy by Petition: Popular Politics in Transformation, 1790-1870

Author: Daniel Carpenter Narrator: Eric Michael Summerer Release Date: July 2021

Known as the age of democracy, the nineteenth century witnessed the extension of the franchise and the rise of party politics. As Daniel Carpenter shows, however, democracy in America emerged not merely through elections and parties, but through the transformation of an ancient political tool: the petition. A statement of grievance accompanied by a list of signatures, the petition afforded women and men excluded from formal politics the chance to make their voices heard and to reshape the landscape of political possibility. Democracy by Petition traces the explosion and expansion of petitioning across the North American continent. Indigenous tribes in Canada, free Blacks from Boston to the British West Indies, Irish canal workers in Indiana, and Hispanic settlers in territorial New Mexico all used petitions to make claims on those in power. Petitions facilitated the extension of suffrage, the decline of feudal land tenure, and advances in liberty for women, African Americans, and Indigenous peoples. Even where petitioners failed in their immediate aims, their campaigns advanced democracy by setting agendas, recruiting people into political causes, and fostering aspirations of equality. The coming of democracy in America owes much to the unprecedented energy with which the petition was employed in the antebellum period.

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